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Oscar Watch - Post Venice/TIFF/NYFF Edition

2020.10.12 20:42 jonisantucho Oscar Watch - Post Venice/TIFF/NYFF Edition

Several months ago, right after the last Academy Awards, I posted a long, long, long list of possible contenders that had prospects to fight for the next Oscars. It was a time of hope, of looking forward, and of positivity.
Then, COVID-19 happened.
And now, we find ourselves in a year that may change the movie industry forever, with the lack of safety of theaters in times of a pandemic accelerating the switch of mainstream audiences to streaming and VOD. These are times where some people are beginning to wonder, even after they pushed the eligibility date for two more months, why the Academy doesn’t cancel next year’s Oscars. And in this rocky terrain, we lost many contenders. Fire up the Hunger Games cannons, because these are some casualties of the season (so far).
Launched to 2021: Annette, Benedetta, Deep Water, Dune, In the Heights, King Richard, Last Night in Soho, Memoria, Nightmare Alley, Passing, Red, White and Water, Raya and the Last Dragon, The Last Duel, The Power of the Dog, Tick, Tick… Boom!, West Side Story.
Unknown status / missing in action: After Yang, Blonde, Breaking News in Yuba County, C’mon C’mon, Next Goal Wins, Stillwater, The French Dispatch, The Humans, The Tragedy of Macbeth, The Eyes of Tammy Faye, Those Who Wish Me Dead.
But even if this year isn’t as loaded with clear awards candidates, there are plenty of movies that are already drawing buzz for an Oscar season that started brewing a month ago, with the kickoff of the Venice Film Festival, and will go on for six and a half more months, when the Academy Awards take place on April 25, 2021. It’s gonna be a long, weird and rocky season, which is gonna be great to see in terms of the narratives that are coming up.
-Ammonite (trailer): When people were betting on the likelier contenders of this year, many people pointed in the direction of Francis Lee’s period drama, with previous Best Actress winner Kate Winslet and constant nominee Saoirse Ronan. Going into the premiere at Toronto, people had their eyes set in this queer romance between a paleontologist and a young wife in the coasts of England during the 19th century. But then, some things happened. First, Winslet started her promotion of the movie by talking about her regret for working with Woody Allen and Roman Polanski that sounded unconvincing to the ominous Film Twitter. Then, another queer period drama, Mona Fastvold’s The World to Come, started to take the attention away at Venice. And finally, the movie premiered. The reaction? Cold. Critics came out mixed with the movie, with many of them comparing it negatively to last year’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire, and saying that it’s too dull and alienating. Does that mean that all is lost? Not exactly. While the movie (which, considering the genre, really needs critics' support to get into the Best Picture category) has been dismissed, the acting by Winslet and Ronan has been received positively. Now that so many other contenders have been dropping out of the year, they might get some room to campaign from a (social) distance.
-Another Round (trailer): Speaking of TIFF premieres, a film that had a better time at the Canadian festival was the reunion between director Thomas Vinterberg and star Mads Mikkelsen, who reunited years after making the stirring drama The Hunt (not the one with Betty Gilpin carrying a bad political satire, the one about a Danish teacher wrongly accused of sexual abuse). This time, the material is lighter, being a dramedy about four teachers who decide to test out a theory about how people can live and work a little better if they increase the level of alcohol in their blood. Critics really liked the way the movie dealt with alcoholism, and Toronto audiences made it a runner up for the People’s Choice Award of the festival. In a year without so much exposure from other festivals, this Cannes 2020 selection could make a candidate for the Best International Film category.
-Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (trailer): Surprise, new Borat film! While Sacha Baron Cohen made headlines several times this year because of stunts that people assumed were about a second season of Who is America?, the Internet was shocked when, in early September, it was confirmed that it was actually a very niiiiice return from the journalist character that made him famous, shot during quarantine. In a matter of weeks after the reveal, the sequel got sold to Amazon Prime and got a release date for October 23. Why so soon? Well, apparently the movie, which got him in trouble with Rudy Giuliani and other people, is about Borat taking his daughter on a road trip to give her as a bride to VP Mike Pence. Even if this movie doesn’t manage to achieve the feats of the 2006 movie (which got a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination, let’s remember), it will help Baron Cohen’s image a lot, because it will come a week after his big Oscar play.
-Cherry: While everybody knows them mostly because of their contributions to the MCU, directors Joe and Anthony Russo and actor Tom Holland are trying to branch out together. Now Apple has bought into their efforts, paying more than 40 million dollars to acquire their new crime drama, about the life of former Army medic Nico Walker, who started robbing banks after his days in Iraq left him with PTSD and a pill addiction. Will Holland manage this time to escape from the shadow of “oh, jeez, Mr. Stark” Spider-Man before Chaos Walking or the Uncharted movie come out? That’s a question for another day.
-Da 5 Bloods (trailer): Talk about timing. Merely days after the country was mobilized by the police brutality that continues to divide the United States, Spike Lee premiered his new war drama on Netflix. In a vibrant, disjointed but passionate portrait of four African American veterans who return to Vietnam to search for their fallen leader and some treasure, Lee struck gold yet again with his usual fans, even though the moving of the Oscar ceremony threatened to make it harder to remind Academy voters about this movie. However, with an astounding performance from Delroy Lindo (who is confirmed to be campaigned in the Best Actor category) and a supporting turn from Chadwick Boseman which got reframed with the news of his bravery in life and death, this has what it takes to fight for a spot in the Best Picture lineup.
-Everybody’s Talking About Jamie (trailer): When it became clear that quarantine wasn’t gonna be a breeze, the first movie in consideration wise enough to move a little further ahead in the calendar was this adaptation of the hit West End production about a gay British teenager who dreams of becoming a drag queen and get his family and schoolmates to accept his sexuality. With a release date on February 26, 20th Century Studios (man, it’s weird to not use Fox in that name) hopes to strike gold, with a cast that mixes young unknowns, familiar names (Sharon Horgan, Sarah Lancashire and my boy Ralph Ineson) and the previously nominated legend that is Richard E. Grant (who is playing a former drag queen named Loco Chanelle), now taking advantage of the move of other musicals like Annette, In The Heights and West Side Story. I mean, this has at the very least some Golden Globes nods in the bag.
-French Exit: Before its premiere as the closing film of the NYFF, many pundits were expecting this surreal comedy to be somewhat of a comeback for past Best Actress nominee Michelle Pfeiffer, who here plays a close to penniless widow who moves to Paris with her son (Lucas Hedges) and cat, who also happens to be her reincarnated husband (Tracy Letts). However, the first reactions for the film adaptation of the Patrick deWitt novel were all over the place, with some people feeling cold by the execution of the weirdness and others being won over. Still, everybody had good things to say about Michelle Pfeiffer’s performance, but after the mixed reception to the rest of Azazel Jacobs’ film she really would need a lot of critics support to get anywhere near the Best Actress category. With a release date on February 12, it seems that Sony Pictures Classics is skipping the critics awards, and the distributor has a couple of big competitors above this one.
-Good Joe Bell: Every year, there are movies with big stars that go to festivals full of hope for praises and awards. Some of them work and go on, others don’t and get forgotten about. Mark Wahlberg tried to remind people that he occasionally is a good actor with a true life drama where he plays a father who decides to walk across America to raise awareness about bullying after his son, tormented for being gay, commits suicide. The film by Reinaldo Marcus Green premiered at TIFF, and the reaction was… not great. Some critics defended it, but most saw it as a flawed, baity product starring a man with a history of hate. Still, it got bought by a distributor: Solstice Studios, a new player in the game which just released its first movie, Unhinged (yup, the one about Russell Crowe road raging). While they paid 20 million dollars for Good Joe Bell, it’s clear that this won’t get near the Oscar telecast.
-Hillbilly Elegy: While many movies this year have some level of anticipation, Film Twitter is bracing for this movie in the “is this gonna be the next Green Book?” way. Ron Howard’s adaptation of J.D. Vance’s memoir about his low income life in a poor rural community in Ohio has many fearing about the overuse of tropes involving what’s called white trash porn, but rarely, Netflix has kept silent about this release. Even though it has Oscar bridesmaids Glenn Close (7 nominations) and Amy Adams (6 nominations), the streamer has not even released a photo of the movie, which supposedly will come out in November. And if you want another bad omen, take a look at the lower levels of this list by a familiar voice.
-I’m Thinking of Ending Things (trailer): Speaking of Netflix, did you know that there is a new Charlie Kaufman there, right now? While his adaptation of the dark novel by Iain Reid, seemingly about a woman (Jessie Buckley) who is taken by her boyfriend (Jesse Plemons) to meet his parents (Toni Collette and David Thewlis), got the usual reception of confusion and praise that follows his movies, the release was followed for what befalls most of the Netflix original movies: a couple of days in the Top 10, and then it fell into the void. While Buckley and Plemons deliver great work in this demented, melancholic story, it’s hard to see this movie getting anything else than a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination for Charlie. And that’s a long shot.
-I’m Your Woman: Following the little seen but critically acclaimed Miss Stevens and Fast Color, Julia Hart started 2020 with a Disney+ adaptation of the YA book Stargirl, and now she follows it with a drama for Amazon that will have its world premiere as the opening film of the AFI fest on October 15. In this movie, Rachel Brosnahan hopes to translate her TV success with The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel to the big screen, playing a woman in the ‘70s that has to go on the run with her kid due to her husband’s crimes.
-Judas and the Black Messiah (trailer): Even if this doesn’t end up winning any awards, it has a real shot at being the best trailer of 2020. Formerly titled Jesus Was My Homeboy, this biographical drama by Shaka King tells the tale of two men: Fred Hampton (Kaluuya), an activist and Black Panther leader, and William O’Neal (Stanfield), the FBI agent sent to infiltrate the party and arrest him. While the trailer for this movie promised a release “only in theaters”, we shall see if Warner Bros backs down from that fight.
-Let Them All Talk: While we’re on the subject of Warner Bros, we have to mention what’s happening with HBO Max. While the start of the streaming service hasn’t been good (I mean, there are still people confused about that name) and it lead to some people assume will cause many firings, it has begun to make some buzzed titles on TV, like Close Enough, Raised by Wolves and the remains of the DC Universe failed streaming service. Now, to make a mark in the movie business, the streamer has a new Steven Soderbergh movie, a comedy that stars Meryl Streep as a celebrated author that takes her friends (Candice Bergen, Dianne Wiest) and her nephew (Lucas Hedges) in a cruise to find fun and come to terms with the past, while he flirts with a literary agent (Gemma Chan). While it doesn’t have a date yet, it’s confirmed to release in 2020, and at least we know that it can’t be worse than The Laundromat.
-Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom: While the expectations for the next film adaptation of an August Wilson acclaimed play were already high, the tragic death of Chadwick Boseman made this Netflix release one of the most anticipated movies of the season, considering this is his final movie. While past Supporting Actress winner Viola Davis takes the lead playing blues singer Ma Rainey in this tale of a heated recording session with her bandmates, her agent and her producer in 1927, Chadwick Boseman has a turn as the trumpeter Levee that was already being considered for awards, and now has even more people waiting to see. The thing is that one of the biggest competitions for Boseman this year will be Boseman himself, for his already acclaimed supporting turn on Da 5 Bloods, also released by Netflix. While the streamer will have to decide which of Chadwick’s performances will get the bigger campaign, this film by director George C. Wolfe has a cushy date set for December 18, and Viola is gunning hard for this movie to win.
-Mank (trailer): As you may have noticed by now, Netflix has a lot of plates spinning around this season, and this is the big one. After befriending the service with House of Cards and Mindhunter, David Fincher is going black and white to tackle a script by his late father Jack, about the making of the classic of classics, Citizen Kane. More specifically, the making of the script, with previous Oscar winner Gary Oldman playing the lead role of screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz, while accompanied by Amanda Seyfried, Lily Collins, Tuppence Middleton, Charles Dance and Tom Burke. After watching the first trailer of his satire of 1930’s Hollywood (that will release on streaming on December 4), it’s clear that this is gonna be catnip to old Academy voters, and it would be really hard for this to miss the Best Picture line up. Unless it’s a complete cinematic disaster, Mank is bank.
-Minari (trailer): While the last edition of Sundance took place in January, quarantine makes you feel like it took place two years ago. This year, the big winner of the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award in the US Dramatic Competition was a dramedy by Lee Isaac Chung, about a Korean family in the ‘80s who suddenly gets moved by their father (Steven Yeun) to Arkansas, to start a farm. Even though the reviews have been great, distributor A24 hasn’t really had a big, Oscar nominated hit for the last couple of years, and the COVID-19 crisis made them delay all their releases. But when we were ready to write this off, a new trailer for the movie came out, confirming that it’s in the game of this awards season. Maybe the pandemic will be of help to A24, considering that one of the reasons they haven’t had success is that they divided their attention into too many releases, and ended up getting not much. This time, they are betting all on Lee who, even if this doesn’t go anywhere, also has a new gig coming up as the director of the live action remake of Your Name.
-News of the World (sneak peek): So much of this year has felt like a game of chicken between a virus and movie studios. While many movies chose to skip this year altogether, Universal remains firm (for now) with its plans to open a wide movie on Christmas Day, with a Western that reunites Paul Greengrass and Tom Hanks in an enticing premise. In this drama based on Paulette Jiles’ novel, Hanks plays a traveling newsreader in the aftermath of the American Civil War, who is tasked with reuniting an orphaned girl with her living relatives. While the first sneak peek of the movie looks promising, the future is still in the air.
-Nomadland (trailer): While the world burns around Hollywood, Searchlight is betting big on Chloe Zhao’s new film. Using the strategy of taking the spotlight while the rest of the contenders is uncertain about how or when to be released, the indie drama began its journey at Venice, with critics raving about the story of a woman (two-time Oscar winner Frances McDormand) who, after losing everything in the Great Recession, embarks on a journey through the American West, living as a van-dwelling modern-day nomad. At the end of the fest, the movie won the coveted Golden Lion. To put that into perspective, the last three winners of the award were past Best Picture nominees The Shape of Water, Roma and Joker, with The Shape of Water (also distributed by Searchlight) also winning the big prize. After drawing critical acclaim following its virtual showing on TIFF and NYFF, Nomadland seems like the first lock in the Best Picture line up. Still, there are obstacles ahead. Will Zhao break the disappointment of the last few years, when deserving candidates for Best Director got blocked by the likes of Adam McKay and Todd Phillips? And will McDormand manage to get near a third Oscar, following a recent win for Three Billboards in Ebbing, Missouri? Time will tell.
-On the Rocks (trailer): While she hasn’t been near the Oscars for a while, Sofia Coppola is still a name that draws attention. This time, she opened the NYFF with a dramedy about a young mother (Rashida Jones) who reunites with her playboy father (Bill Murray, also reuniting with Sofia after Lost in Translation) on an adventure through New York to find out if her husband (Marlon Wayans) is cheating on her. The consensus seems to be that, while light and not near her best work, it’s still a fun and breezy movie, with a very good turn by Murray. While many would assume that this A24 production will disappear into the abyss when it releases on Apple TV+ on October 23, the dropping out of many candidates gives the movie a chance to, at least, fight for some Golden Globes.
-One Night in Miami (sneak peek): Following her recent Oscar and Emmy wins for If Beale Street Could Talk and Watchmen, Regina King is still striking hard, and this time, she’s doing it as a director. For her big screen debut as a filmmaker, she chose to adapt Kemp Powers’ play that dramatizes a real meeting on February 25, 1964, when Muhammad Ali (Eli Goree) followed an iconic win with a hangout session with Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir), Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.) and Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge). Opening at Venice, the film received glowing reviews, with many praising King (even though some said that the movie doesn’t fully translate the play to the film medium) and the actors’ performances, especially Ben-Adir and Odom Jr. (who, it should be said, also wrote an original song for the end credits of the movie, which could help his Oscar chances). Amazon Prime is hoping that this is their big contender this year, with plans of a theatrical release on Christmas and a streaming release on January 15. Judging by the praise this got at festival season, it has a chance to go a long way.
-Over the Moon (trailer): In a year with not that many contenders for Best Animated Feature, Netflix is betting on a musical adventure directed by the legendary Glen Keane, a classic Disney animator who recently won an Oscar for Best Animated Short for co-directing Dear Basketball. While our expectations were lowered by the first trailer for the movie, centered around a Chinese girl who builds a rocket ship and blasts off to the Moon in hopes of meeting a legendary Goddess, it’s still safe to assume that it has a shot at being nominated for something. Netflix also hopes that you like its big candidate for Best Original Song, which really, really sounds like a Disney ballad.
-Pieces of a Woman: While this year doesn’t have the amount of surprise contenders that a regular Oscar season usually has, we still have some movies that sneaked through festival season. The first one was the new, somber drama by Hungarian director Kornél Mundruczó, known for the doggy uprising pic White God, and the not-so-well-received sci-fi Jupiter’s Moon. This time, we follow a woman (Vanessa Kirby) whose life is torn apart after a home birth at the hands of a flustered midwife (Molly Parker) ends in tragedy, and then leads to a court battle that also makes her confront her husband (Shia LaBeouf) and her domineering mother (Ellen Burstyn). While the movie had mixed reactions, Kirby had plenty of raves in her direction, particularly concerning her performance during a 25-minute birth sequence that is said to be brutal. That brutality paid off, though, because Kirby ended up winning Best Actress at Venice, and Netflix bought the movie, which also has Martin Scorsese as an executive producer. If the Academy wants to crown a new face in the scene, Kirby is the one who will be targeted, following her acclaimed turn in The Crown and her supporting roles in blockbusters like Mission Impossible: Fallout and Hobbs & Shaw.
-Promising Young Woman (trailer): When theaters started to close because of the pandemic, Universal started the push of their movies going straight to VOD, with titles including Trolls World Tour and Never Rarely Sometimes Always. However, there was a title that was supposed to premiere in April, and then suddenly disappeared from existence. It was the directorial debut of actress Emerald Fennell, who wrote a black comedy with touches of a thriller, centered on a woman in her thirties (Carey Mulligan) whose bright future was derailed by a traumatic event, and who’s now looking for revenge. While the reaction to its premiere at Sundance wasn’t enough to consider a Best Picture run, the twisted performance by Mulligan earned her the best praise since the last time she was nominated for an Oscar, a decade ago for An Education. Now, Focus Features is planning to open the movie at Christmas, and are positioning Carey for a run at Best Actress.
-Rebecca (trailer): When the news came out saying that Ben Wheatley would adapt Daphne du Maurier’s psychological thriller novel for Netflix, many were shocked. Some people considered the chance that this was an awards play by the cult director, who is doing the same work that earned Alfred Hitchcock his only Best Picture win. But seeing the trailer for this new version, with Lily James playing the newly married young woman who finds herself battling the shadow of her husband's (Armie Hammer) dead first wife Rebecca, we have to wonder if there’s a point to the existence of this remake. We will find out if there’s any awards chances for this movie on October 21, when it releases on streaming. Let’s hope that Kristin Scott Thomas has something to play with as Mrs. Danvers.
-Respect (trailer): Every year, there’s one or two actors who announce to the world “I want an Oscar” and campaign like their lives depended on it. Last time, it was Taron Egerton (accompanied by Elton John, who actually ended up winning another Oscar). This year, it is the turn of Jennifer Hudson, who is playing Aretha Franklin in a biopic directed by first timer Liesl Tommy, and who’s hoping that this attempt at awards ends up more like Dreamgirls than like Cats. She has been doing announcement trailers (a year in advance), quarantine tributes, award show tributes, and every possible thing to get the industry to notice that she’s playing Aretha. Hey, Rami Malek and Renee Zellweger did it in the last few years, why can’t she. With a release date of January 15, Hudson wants that gold.
-Soul (trailer): Disney may be the studio that suffered the biggest hit because of the pandemic. Their parks are a loss, most of their big productions had to stop because of quarantine, and theaters in many parts of the world are closed. After the failure of Tenet for Warner Bros. and the experiment of the mouse house of charging people 30 dollars to see Mulan (which didn’t work at all), many wondered if Disney was gonna delay the new production by Pixar, written and directed by Pete Docter, who brought Oscar gold to his home with Up and Inside Out. The movie, which centers on a teacher (Jamie Foxx) who dreams of becoming a jazz musician and, just as he’s about to get his big break, ends up getting into an accident that separates his soul from his body, had a lot of promise, but the speculation of lost money was also a concern. Finally, Disney decided to release the movie on Christmas, but only on Disney Plus, causing another failure for theaters, but assuring that Disney at least can get more subscribers to its streaming service. And the movie? Well, it just premiered at the London Film Festival, and the critics are saying it’s Pixar at its best, with praises going from the look, to the script by co-director Kemp Powers (who also wrote the play of One Night in Miami, so he has many chances for a nod), to the score by Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross and Jon Batiste. That means that it’s already a top contender to win Best Animated Feature, and this may not be the only category in which the movie is gonna get nominated.
-Supernova (trailer): If there’s a theme this year in terms of Oscar contenders, it might be dementia. One of the examples of this is a small road movie directed by Hairy Macqueen, which premiered to good reviews at the San Sebastian festival. This drama centers on a trip taken by Sam (Colin Firth) and Tusker (Stanley Tucci), partners for 20 years, who travel across England reuniting with friends and family, because Tusker was diagnosed with early onset dementia. While usually the big awards role is usually the one of the person who suffers the illnesses, some reviewers are calling Firth’s work as the supporting companion some of the best of his career. With Bleecker Street buying the rights for a US release, this is a little film that could still make some moves.
-Tenet (trailer): For the first five months of quarantine, the big narrative in the world of film was “Christopher Nolan is gonna save cinemas”. But after postponing the release of the mind bending actioner for months on end, creating big demands and expectations to theater owners, and finally releasing as the sacrificial lamb of Hollywood, Warner Bros ended up seeing the opposite effect. Even though Tom Cruise loved to be back at the movies, critics didn’t share enough excitement to make a spy movie that goes backwards worth the possibility of dying of coronavirus. The audiences didn’t show up as much, and those who did attend, mostly complained about the sound mixing and the plot. After all the sacrifice, it’s highly unlikely that Tenet goes beyond technical awards. Let’s start the “Travis Scott for Best Original Song” campaign now, before it’s too late.
-The Boys in the Band (trailer): The Ryan Murphy blank check for Netflix has been interesting to follow. On the one hand, we have his new TV shows, which go from not existing (The Politician), to alternate movie history that doesn’t know how alternate history works (Hollywood), to a challenge of how much TV will you stomach if Sarah Paulson and other middle aged actresses are campy in it (Ratched). And now, we are seeing his producing hand over the movie side, which starts with the new film adaptation of the cult play from 1968, which was already a movie in 1970 and recently jumped to Broadway in 2018. The cast from the recent Broadway production (which includes Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto, Matt Bomer and Andrew Rannells) stars in Joe Mantello’s movie, telling the story of a group of gay friends in pre-Stonewall New York who reunite for a birthday party and end up revealing a lot of open wounds. While this movie got good reviews from critics, it kinda disappeared without a sound after beginning to stream on Netflix at the end of September. Unless the service wants to campaign for Golden Globes, this film is lost in the algorithm.
-The Devil All the Time (trailer): Another September release on Netflix was the new psychological thriller by Antonio Campos (Simon Killer, Christine) who didn’t manage to continue his streak of intense and terrifying character dramas with his messy adaptation of the dark novel by Donald Ray Pollock. Wasting a cast that includes Tom Holland, Sebastian Stan, Robert Pattinson, Mia Wasikowska, Eliza Scanlen, Bill Skarsgard, Jason Clarke and Riley Keough, this twisted period piece managed to stay for a while in the Top 10, but the reactions from critics were mixed, and audiences were busy asking what was happening with Pattinson’s Southern accent (which with The King makes two years in a row, baby). The many prognosticators who had hopes for an awards play moved on a while ago.
-The Father (trailer): It’s safe to say at this point that Anthony Hopkins is a lock for a Best Actor nomination at the next Oscars. After its premiere in Sundance, every prognosticator pointed in his direction, and for the next few months he swept praise for his harrowing portrayal of an old man grappling with his age as he develops dementia, causing pain to his beleaguered daughter (recent winner Olivia Colman, who also got praised). Sony Pictures Classics will make Florian Zeller’s adaptation of his acclaimed play its big contender of the season, using Hopkins (who this year got a nom for The Two Popes) as a starter to also get Colman, Zeller and the movie nominated.
-The Human Voice (trailer): And speaking of Sony Pictures Classics, it’s almost safe to say that they have another Oscar in the bag this year. That’s because they just bought Pedro Almodóvar’s short film, his English-speaking debut that is an adaptation of the play by Jean Cocteau. In his version (that was acclaimed by critics after premiering in Venice), Tilda Swinton plays the woman waiting at the end of a phone, expecting to hear from his ex-lover who abandoned her. Considering how the competition for Best Live Action Short Film has become somewhat lacking in the last few years (I mean, have you seen Skin), this should be an easy award to win, especially considering how beloved Almodóvar is in the Academy, which nominated him this year for the great Pain and Glory.
-The Life Ahead: While we’re talking about legends, it’s time to talk about Sophia Loren. 16 years after her last leading role in a movie, the Italian icon returns with a drama that was bought by Netflix, who plans to campaign for her as Best Actress and for the movie in the Best International Film category. Directed by Edoardo Ponti (who is also Sophia’s son), this movie centers on a Holocaust survivor who takes in a 12-year-old boy who recently robbed her, in a contemporary adaptation of Romain Gary’s novel The Life Before Us. Netflix has set a date for November 13 to release this movie, and the campaign seems to be about the narrative of seeing Loren winning another Oscar 60 years after she won her first one for Two Women, by Vittorio De Sica.
-The Midnight Sky: Based on the novel Good Morning, Midnight, this collaboration between George Clooney and Netflix is once again making us ask one thing. Are we gonna get the director Clooney of Good Night and Good Luck, or are we gonna get the director Clooney of Leatherheads, The Ides of March, The Monuments Men and Suburbicon? Let’s hope he breaks his streak of blandness with this sci-fi story, which makes us think a little bit of Gravity: A lonely scientist in the Arctic (Clooney) races to stop a group of astronauts led by Felicity Jones from returning to a devastated Earth. With a release set for December, we have to hope that this is more than some Top 10 filler that will evaporate from existence in a week’s time.
-The Prom: In probably the biggest blank check of the Ryan Murphy deal with Netflix, this musical he’ll direct is based on the Tony-nominated show about a group of Broadway losers (Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman, Andrew Rannells and James “boo” Corden) who try to find a viral story to get back in the spotlight, and end up going to a town in Indiana to help a lesbian high school student who has been banned from bringing her girlfriend to the prom. While it’s clear that this December 11 release is gonna sweep the Golden Globes, the emptiness of this year compared to others could clear the way for some Oscar nominations, including Meryl and the obligatory original song added to a preexisting musical for easy clout.
-The Trial of the Chicago 7 (trailer): When it was announced that Paramount was selling Aaron Sorkin’s new movie to Netflix, some people saw it as a studio dumping a failed awards vehicle to be forgotten. However, the excuse that Sorkin wanted to release this movie before the US presidential elections seems to be true, because critics really enjoyed his old school courtroom drama, centered around the trial on counter cultural activists in the late ‘60s. Everybody praised uniformly the huge cast, that includes Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Jeremy Strong, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Frank Langella, William Hurt, Michael Keaton and Mark Rylance, which guarantees a SAG awards nomination (but makes it difficult to decide which actors will actually get nominated for Oscars). With a reaction that brings to mind the days of A Few Good Men and is the best reception he got since his Oscar winning script for The Social Network, the film faces a couple of hurdles. First of all, it got positioned as the frontrunner in the Best Picture race by some people, which instantly puts a target on its back. Then, we have to consider that the movie releases on Netflix this Friday, October 16, which makes it the first big contender this year to face the world, and which in these times of lockdown will probably make the reception to Marriage Story and The Irishman from last year look like a walk in the park. I mean, there are some people who aren’t swayed by Sorkin, and for good reason.
-The United States vs. Billie Holiday: While Paramount was quick to hand The Trial of the Chicago 7 to Netflix, there’s another movie that the studio kept to play in the upcoming awards season. This biographical drama follows the life of another famous musician, Billie Holiday (Andra Day), and we see the journey of her career in jazz as she is targeted by the Federal Department of Narcotics with an undercover sting operation led by Federal Agent Jimmy Fletcher (Trevante Rhodes), with whom she had a tumultuous affair. While the movie counts with a screenplay credit by Pulitzer winner Suzan-Lori Parks, the big question mark is the film’s director, Lee Daniels, who hit it big with Precious and then had results that were disastrous (The Paperboy) or financially successful, but not awards-wise (Lee Daniels’ The Butler). However, Paramount trusts in this movie, and with a release date on February 12, they want to make a splash.
-Wolfwalkers (trailer): While the attempts by Apple TV+ to establish themselves as a player in the TV world go from trainwrecks (See) to forgettable (The Morning Show) to eventually great (see Ted Lasso, everybody, this is not a joke), their plans to make a name in the film business have something to do with this year’s Oscars. While Cherry can come or go, they have a solid contender for the Best Feature Documentary with Boys State, but their big dog this year is the new movie by Cartoon Saloon, an Irish studio responsible for the acclaimed The Secret of Kells, The Song of the Sea, and The Breadwinner, all of which were nominated for Best Animated Feature. This time, Tomm Moore and Ross Stewart direct a story about a young apprentice hunter who journeys with her father to Ireland to help wipe out the last wolf pack. But everything changes when she befriends a free-spirited girl from a mysterious tribe rumored to transform into wolves by night. After getting critically acclaimed following its premiere at TIFF, this is a surefire contender for this year’s Best Animated Feature category, and Apple is gonna parade it before its streaming release on December 11. Also, while you watch that, you could watch a couple of episodes of Ted Lasso, too. It’s a really good show, it’s all I’m saying.
Anyways, that’s all the news from the last few months of festivals. No matter what happens next, this is gonna be a long, long, long race.
submitted by jonisantucho to blankies [link] [comments]


2020.08.13 13:31 longhigy [H]All the released Masterclass classes: Tony Hawk, Sheila E, Brandon Mcmillan etc. [W] $2 Paypal each, $15 for EVERYTHING

Robin Roberts communication avaliable now!! Ron Finley Teaches Gardening avaliable now !!
Kelly Wearstler Teaches Interior Design
Eclectic and experiential, Kelly Wearstler’s style helped redefine modern American design and influenced the rise of designer hotels. Now the award-winning designer takes you behind the scenes to demystify interior design. Make any space feel larger, and choose colors, materials, and textures with confidence. Curate collections of art and objects, cultivate your own distinct style, and create spaces that tell a story.
Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana TEACH MIXOLOGY
Meet Your Instructors: Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana A leader in the New York City–based craft cocktail movement, Lynnette Marrero is the bar director at the Llama Inn in Brooklyn. Nicknamed “Mr Lyan,” Ryan Chetiyawardana has opened award-winning bars around the world.
RUPAUL TEACHES SELF-EXPRESSION AND AUTHENTICITY RuPaul has transformed drag subculture into a mainstream phenomenon with devoted fans across the world. Now the Emmy-winning host, performer, and drag icon is sharing an intimate look at his personal journey to self-realization. From finding your inner truth to owning the room, RuPaul teaches you how to present your best self to the world. It’s your life’s work to shine—RuPaul shows you how. JEFF GOODBY & RICH SILVERSTEIN TEACH ADVERTISING AND CREATIVITY Meet Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein, founders of the legendary advertising agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners. Jeff and Rich introduce themselves and set the stage for their class.
Gabriela Camara MEXICAN COOKING Meet your new instructor: internationally acclaimed chef and restaurateur Gabriela Cámara. Gabriela shares how she became a chef, the origin story of her famed restaurant Contramar in Mexico City, and her philosophy on food and hospitality.
Neil deGrasse Tyson Teaches Scientific Thinking and Communication
With a hit talk show and bestselling books, Neil deGrasse Tyson is one of the most popular figures in modern science. Now the influential astrophysicist teaches you how his mind works and how he connects with audiences. Learn to think like a skeptic, open your own mind through scientific literacy, distill data, and navigate bias to discover objective truths—and deliver your ideas in ways that engage, excite, and inspire.
CHRIS VOSSTEACHES THE ART OF NEGOTIATION
Meet your new instructor: former FBI lead international kidnapping negotiator Chris Voss. While many believe that negotiation is a battle, Chris sees successful negotiation as a collaboration rooted in empathy.
MISTY COPELAND TEACHES BALLET TECHNIQUE AND ARTISTRY
American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Misty Copeland teaches you how to build your technique, embrace your story, and own your movement.
Doris Kearns Goodwin Teaches U.S. Presidential History and Leadership
Meet your instructor: Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and bestselling author Doris Kearns Goodwin. She talks about why she’s excited to teach this class, how she came to love history, and her path to becoming a presidential historian.
BOBBI BROWN TEACHES MAKEUP AND BEAUTY Bobbi Brown teaches you the tips, tricks, and techniques for applying simple, natural makeup that makes you feel beautiful in your own skin.
BOB IGER TEACHES BUSINESS STRATEGY AND LEADERSHIP
Meet your new instructor: chairman and CEO Bob Iger. In his introduction, Bob talks about what he’s learned from great teachers and what he wants to share with you.
THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS
In his third MasterClass, Chef Thomas Keller focuses on preparing fresh seafood like lobster and salmon, making classic desserts such as apple pie and lemon tart, and showing how sous vide cooking can be done at home to enhance flavor and texture. Whether you’re a beginning or advanced cook, you’ll learn the techniques and principles that will give you the understanding and skills to get the most delicious results.
DANNY ELFMAN TEACHES MUSIC FOR FILM
From The Simpsons theme to the soundtracks of Tim Burton’s Pee-wee’s Big Adventure and The Nightmare Before Christmas, Danny Elfman’s compositions are original, memorable, and exuberantly weird. Now the Oingo Boingo founder and four-time Oscar nominee shares his unconventional (and uncensored) creative process. Step into Danny’s studio and learn his techniques for evoking emotion and elevating a story through music.
SARA BLAKELY TEACHES SELF-MADE ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Meet your instructor: self-made billionaire and founder of Spanx, Sara Blakely. Sara talks about her journey as an inventor and entrepreneur, sharing that her purpose is to serve women and make products for women better.
From now i'll sell a cooking pack for $10 which includes
Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Alice Waters - Home Cooking Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Gabriela Camara mexican cooking Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation lynnette marrero & ryan chetiyawardana mixology Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
For $15 you'll get EVERYTHING
Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Aaron Sorkin – Screenwriting Alice Waters - Home Cooking Annie Leibovitz - Photography Armin Van Buuren - Dance Music Billy Collins - Teaches Reading and Writing Poetry Bob Woodward - Investigative Journalism Carlos Santana Teaches The Art And Soul Of Guitar Chris Hadfield Teaches Space Exploration Christina Aguilera - Teaches Singing Dan Brown Teaches Writing Thrillers Daniel Negreanu Teaches Poker David Axelrod and Karl Rove Teach Campaign Strategy David Lynch - Teaches Creativity and Film David Mamet - Dramatic Writing Deadmau5 - Electronic Music Production Diane von Furstenberg - Building a Fashion Brand Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Dr. Jane Goodall Teaches Conservation Dustin Hoffman - Acting Frank Gehry - Design and Architecture Garry Kasparov - Chess Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home Hans Zimmer - Film Scoring Helen Mirren - Acting Herbie Hancock - Jazz Howard Schultz about leading a values-based business Itzhak Perlman teches violin James Patterson - Writing James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation Jane Goodall - Conservation Jimmy Chin Photography Jodie Foster teaches filmmaking Joyce Carol Oates Teaches the Art of the Short Story Judd Apatow Teaches Comedy Judy Blume Teaches Writing Ken Burns Teaches Documentary Filmmaking Kevin Spacey - Acting Malcolm Gladwell Teaches Writing Marc Jacobs - Fashion Design Margaret Atwood Teaches Creative Writing Martin Scorsese - Filmmaking Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Mira Nair Teaches Independent Filmmaking Neil Gaiman Teaches the Art of Storytelling PAUL KRUGMAN TEACHES ECONOMICS AND SOCIETY Penn and Teller - Teach the Art of Magic PHIL IVEY TEACHES POKER STRATEGY Reba McEntire - Country Music Reba McEntire Teaches Country Music Ron Howard - Directing Samuel L. Jackson Teaches Acting Serena Williams - Tennis Shonda Rhimes Teaches Writing for Television Spike Lee Teaches Independent Filmmaking Stephen Curry Teaches Basketball Steve Martin - Comedy Stine teaches Writing for young Audiences Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces Timbaland - Teaches Producing and Beatmaking Tom Morello Teaches Electric Guitar Usher - The Art of Performance Werner Herzog Teaches Filmmaking Will Wright Teaches Game Design and Theory Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
After payment you'll get a google drive link with the selected class/es !
I have lots of other interesting stuff you might need(audiobooks, courses, fitness programs, business stuff, rare shows etc I have HQ courses from Jordan Belfort , Ezra Firestone, Iman Gadzhi, Wall street stuff, photography courses etc..
submitted by longhigy to forsale [link] [comments]


2020.08.13 13:29 longhigy [H]All the released Masterclass classes: Tony Hawk, Sheila E, Brandon Mcmillan etc. [W] $2 Paypal each, $15 for EVERYTHING

Sheila E avaliable! Robin Roberts communication avaliable now!! Ron Finley Teaches Gardening avaliable now !!
Kelly Wearstler Teaches Interior Design
Eclectic and experiential, Kelly Wearstler’s style helped redefine modern American design and influenced the rise of designer hotels. Now the award-winning designer takes you behind the scenes to demystify interior design. Make any space feel larger, and choose colors, materials, and textures with confidence. Curate collections of art and objects, cultivate your own distinct style, and create spaces that tell a story.
Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana TEACH MIXOLOGY
Meet Your Instructors: Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana A leader in the New York City–based craft cocktail movement, Lynnette Marrero is the bar director at the Llama Inn in Brooklyn. Nicknamed “Mr Lyan,” Ryan Chetiyawardana has opened award-winning bars around the world.
RUPAUL TEACHES SELF-EXPRESSION AND AUTHENTICITY RuPaul has transformed drag subculture into a mainstream phenomenon with devoted fans across the world. Now the Emmy-winning host, performer, and drag icon is sharing an intimate look at his personal journey to self-realization. From finding your inner truth to owning the room, RuPaul teaches you how to present your best self to the world. It’s your life’s work to shine—RuPaul shows you how. JEFF GOODBY & RICH SILVERSTEIN TEACH ADVERTISING AND CREATIVITY Meet Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein, founders of the legendary advertising agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners. Jeff and Rich introduce themselves and set the stage for their class.
Gabriela Camara MEXICAN COOKING Meet your new instructor: internationally acclaimed chef and restaurateur Gabriela Cámara. Gabriela shares how she became a chef, the origin story of her famed restaurant Contramar in Mexico City, and her philosophy on food and hospitality.
Neil deGrasse Tyson Teaches Scientific Thinking and Communication
With a hit talk show and bestselling books, Neil deGrasse Tyson is one of the most popular figures in modern science. Now the influential astrophysicist teaches you how his mind works and how he connects with audiences. Learn to think like a skeptic, open your own mind through scientific literacy, distill data, and navigate bias to discover objective truths—and deliver your ideas in ways that engage, excite, and inspire.
CHRIS VOSSTEACHES THE ART OF NEGOTIATION
Meet your new instructor: former FBI lead international kidnapping negotiator Chris Voss. While many believe that negotiation is a battle, Chris sees successful negotiation as a collaboration rooted in empathy.
MISTY COPELAND TEACHES BALLET TECHNIQUE AND ARTISTRY
American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Misty Copeland teaches you how to build your technique, embrace your story, and own your movement.
Doris Kearns Goodwin Teaches U.S. Presidential History and Leadership
Meet your instructor: Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and bestselling author Doris Kearns Goodwin. She talks about why she’s excited to teach this class, how she came to love history, and her path to becoming a presidential historian.
BOBBI BROWN TEACHES MAKEUP AND BEAUTY Bobbi Brown teaches you the tips, tricks, and techniques for applying simple, natural makeup that makes you feel beautiful in your own skin.
BOB IGER TEACHES BUSINESS STRATEGY AND LEADERSHIP
Meet your new instructor: chairman and CEO Bob Iger. In his introduction, Bob talks about what he’s learned from great teachers and what he wants to share with you.
THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS
In his third MasterClass, Chef Thomas Keller focuses on preparing fresh seafood like lobster and salmon, making classic desserts such as apple pie and lemon tart, and showing how sous vide cooking can be done at home to enhance flavor and texture. Whether you’re a beginning or advanced cook, you’ll learn the techniques and principles that will give you the understanding and skills to get the most delicious results.
DANNY ELFMAN TEACHES MUSIC FOR FILM
From The Simpsons theme to the soundtracks of Tim Burton’s Pee-wee’s Big Adventure and The Nightmare Before Christmas, Danny Elfman’s compositions are original, memorable, and exuberantly weird. Now the Oingo Boingo founder and four-time Oscar nominee shares his unconventional (and uncensored) creative process. Step into Danny’s studio and learn his techniques for evoking emotion and elevating a story through music.
SARA BLAKELY TEACHES SELF-MADE ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Meet your instructor: self-made billionaire and founder of Spanx, Sara Blakely. Sara talks about her journey as an inventor and entrepreneur, sharing that her purpose is to serve women and make products for women better.
From now i'll sell a cooking pack for $10 which includes
Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Alice Waters - Home Cooking Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Gabriela Camara mexican cooking Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation lynnette marrero & ryan chetiyawardana mixology Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
For $15 you'll get EVERYTHING
Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Aaron Sorkin – Screenwriting Alice Waters - Home Cooking Annie Leibovitz - Photography Armin Van Buuren - Dance Music Billy Collins - Teaches Reading and Writing Poetry Bob Woodward - Investigative Journalism Carlos Santana Teaches The Art And Soul Of Guitar Chris Hadfield Teaches Space Exploration Christina Aguilera - Teaches Singing Dan Brown Teaches Writing Thrillers Daniel Negreanu Teaches Poker David Axelrod and Karl Rove Teach Campaign Strategy David Lynch - Teaches Creativity and Film David Mamet - Dramatic Writing Deadmau5 - Electronic Music Production Diane von Furstenberg - Building a Fashion Brand Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Dr. Jane Goodall Teaches Conservation Dustin Hoffman - Acting Frank Gehry - Design and Architecture Garry Kasparov - Chess Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home Hans Zimmer - Film Scoring Helen Mirren - Acting Herbie Hancock - Jazz Howard Schultz about leading a values-based business Itzhak Perlman teches violin James Patterson - Writing James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation Jane Goodall - Conservation Jimmy Chin Photography Jodie Foster teaches filmmaking Joyce Carol Oates Teaches the Art of the Short Story Judd Apatow Teaches Comedy Judy Blume Teaches Writing Ken Burns Teaches Documentary Filmmaking Kevin Spacey - Acting Malcolm Gladwell Teaches Writing Marc Jacobs - Fashion Design Margaret Atwood Teaches Creative Writing Martin Scorsese - Filmmaking Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Mira Nair Teaches Independent Filmmaking Neil Gaiman Teaches the Art of Storytelling PAUL KRUGMAN TEACHES ECONOMICS AND SOCIETY Penn and Teller - Teach the Art of Magic PHIL IVEY TEACHES POKER STRATEGY Reba McEntire - Country Music Reba McEntire Teaches Country Music Ron Howard - Directing Samuel L. Jackson Teaches Acting Serena Williams - Tennis Shonda Rhimes Teaches Writing for Television Spike Lee Teaches Independent Filmmaking Stephen Curry Teaches Basketball Steve Martin - Comedy Stine teaches Writing for young Audiences Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces Timbaland - Teaches Producing and Beatmaking Tom Morello Teaches Electric Guitar Usher - The Art of Performance Werner Herzog Teaches Filmmaking Will Wright Teaches Game Design and Theory Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
After payment you'll get a google drive link with the selected class/es !
I have lots of other interesting stuff you might need(audiobooks, courses, fitness programs, business stuff, rare shows etc I have HQ courses from Jordan Belfort , Ezra Firestone, Iman Gadzhi, Wall street stuff, photography courses etc..
submitted by longhigy to market [link] [comments]


2020.06.20 18:35 print_station Let's Talk About Page Count

Questions about page count come up a lot on this sub. Mostly in the form of writers seeking permission to call their 56-page feature complete. But it sometimes goes the other way, with writers swearing that a word can't be cut from their 160-page behemoths. So I thought it might be helpful to do a quick rundown on the ins and outs of feature-length page count.
What Is Standard? Generally speaking, standard script length is between 80 and 120 pages. Just a few years ago, I would have said 90 and 120, but there have been a lot of 80-ish page scripts that have cropped up on the Blacklist in the last couple of years, so I think that lower page count is becoming more accepted. Even as I say that though, I personally think that the 80 and 120 pagers are extremes. The majority of scripts, at least the ones I've worked on, have been around 100 pages.
Whenever the question of page count comes up, people bring up the page-per-minute maxim. I think the page-per-minute thing is only an imperfect rule of thumb at best. Dialogue-heavy scenes are going to go much faster; action-heavy scenes, especially tense ones, are likely to go much slower. So while it's convenient to think about a 100-page script resulting in a 100-minute movie, it's just not the way it shakes out a lot of time. And when it does, I would argue it's largely coincidental.
Of course, no conversation about page count would be complete without talking about the outliers. We all know what they are. Quiet Place, Ghost Story, All Is Lost, Somewhere, Social Network, et cetera. I would argue that the reason we all know about these is that they are true exceptions, all born from unique sets of circumstances. They are far from the norm. Ultimately, your career is your career, but me personally, I'm not going to count on producers or studio execs understanding the unique vision of a story I'm trying to tell. I'm going to try to hit the standard landing zone.
Adjusting Length If your script is severely outside the bounds of standard, your first order of business is to figure out why. More than likely, there are foundational story issues. If you're too short, are you missing beats or even entire sequences that movies in your genre tend to have? If your macro story structure is solid, are you not making the most of the tentpole moments in your story? For example, I write a lot of horror, and I often find that my scare sequences are too slimmed down in my initial drafts. So I end up dragging out the tension, beefing up the scary beats, and suddenly one or two pages can become three or four pages.
If you're too long, just go the other way. Do you have added beats or sequences? Do your scenes have a bunch of filler? Most of the time, scripts that are too long start too early. They'll have bloated first acts that burn too slowly or spend too much time setting up the normal state of the world. They also tend to have extraneous characters and subplots.
Again, know the movie you're writing, know your genre. What are the story points those kinds of movies hit? Of course, you should be subversive, give us stuff we haven't seen before, surprise us, but in a very macro sense, I'd suggest that your scripts fit within a familiar mold.
Once you've done your due diligence and determined that your story structure is working, your scenes are tight, and there is nothing more of substance to either add or subtract, manipulating your page count is actually pretty simple. It can be tedious. But it is simple. Personally, I'm meticulous about the way my pages flow. (My wife/writing partner would say I'm unnecessarily obsessive, but that's just, like, her opinion.)
Most of my time spent on page manipulation goes towards making things shorter and tighter. To do that, the first step is getting rid of all the widows and generally cutting as many lines out of the script as possible. Can that action block that's 2 1/2 lines be cut down to two? Can that 4 1/2 line dialogue block be cut down to three? Or even two? Can those lines of dialogue be cut entirely? Usually they can. Not only does this help to make the pages tighter, but in a narrative sense it makes the script sharper.
Another thing I'll do is streamline interactions within scenes. If a character has some dialogue, then there's an action line, then that character's dialogue picks back up, I'll try to see if I can cover the substance of that action line with an in-dialogue parenthetical. Also, sometimes dialogue itself can be covered by action. If a character simply says "yes" or "no", then that dialogue can be substituted for a head nod or shake in action. Saving you a line.
It may sound small, but these cuts can make a huge difference, especially early on in a script. On occasion, I'll pull a line out of the first ten pages, and that'll cause cascading changes throughout the script and eliminate an entire page.
Adding pages to a script that's on the shorter side is even easier. Simply break up blocks of action. Don't be afraid of having a single sentence on a line by itself and really letting the page breathe. Also, you can reorder or reword sentences to create widows and orphans. As with cutting pages, these small changes can really add up throughout the script.
In general, I'd say it's possible to adjust script length by as many as ten pages in either direction just through calculated manipulation of the words on the page.
Is Your Script an Outlier? As I stated earlier, your script is your business. I'm not writing this to scold, embarrass or in any way force you to change what you're putting on the page. I'm merely offering suggestions. To that end, I'll offer some tales from the trenches regarding page counts.
On several occasions, I've been given maximum page limits by producers. Blumhouse, for example, used to have a 90-page max for all of their low-budget projects. Last year, I did a project and was told by the producer that the script could under no circumstances exceed 100 pages. Similarly, I had a network tell me my pilot couldn't go over 59 pages.
Why do I bring this up? I've never worked intimately with production, but I think the fact that producers frequently talk about script length is meaningful. They're using page count to budget, they're using it to plan, and part of what they're relying on is some kind of standardization across different projects.
Should a line producer be savvy enough to look at your 160-page feature and budget it correctly? Probably. Should a studio exec be able to look at it and determine if there's the correct amount of story for a feature film? You'd hope so. But that's just not the way things are done. If the lore is true, Aaron Sorkin had to read his entire Social Network script aloud to David Fincher to prove it could be done in two hours. If Sorkin has to do that with an outlier script, what chance do the rest of us have?
Like it or not, readers will probably judge your script based on page count. It's simply human nature. If it's too out of whack in one direction or the other, they may view it as a red flag that the writer is inexperienced. Additionally, if it's too long, the reader may be annoyed by the extra reading time. And even if they look past all of that and recommend the script to their boss, they'll then have to defend that choice to someone who will likely have similar hangups about the script's non-traditional length. Why make your script jump through those hoops?
If you keep your project within the normal range, you'll never have to worry about it. Good luck with whatever you're working on. And stay safe out there.
submitted by print_station to Screenwriting [link] [comments]


2020.05.18 17:04 SimonSays18 IJW: The Social Network (2010)

Link to my original review: https://simonsaysfilm.blogspot.com/2020/05/the-social-network-2010-10-years-later.html
There isn't much that I could say about this film that hasn't already been belabored by many a movie critic over the last decade. We know about Aaron Sorkin's zippy, razor-sharp dialogue that is wholly emblematic of the man as a writer, but also perfectly akin to the kind of sleek, voguish movie that The Social Network ultimately is. Even 10 years since its release, and in a time where social media is exorbitantly more prevalent than the filmmakers could have imagined, the film feels urgent. Modern, even.
We also know about David Fincher's polished direction. The cold visual sheen that characterizes much of his filmography is present here, even though the story he is telling diverges from the crime-oriented thrillers he is known for making. Fincher's sober directing style is an unlikely pairing with Sorkin's vibrant, almost hyperactive penmanship. But it is, ultimately, a happy marriage.
We know about the opulent performances. Jesse Eisenberg, whose subsequent acting career has felt to me like a series of unfortunate miscastings, seems to have been born to embody the twerpy, unsociable presence of Sorkin's Mark Zuckerberg. It's a career-best turn as the Facebook founder and subject of Sorkin's close, critical study. He's joined by the equally capable Andrew Garfield, who turned in a really solid and underrated performance as Zuckerberg's close friend and business partner, Eduardo Saverin. He's ultimately a tragic figure in this story, and Garfield elicits plenty of sympathy. Armie Hammer and Justin Timberlake round out the main cast and both do great supporting work.
We know about the riveting monologues. We know about the agonizing betrayals. We know about the hypnotic score that palpitates beneath the on screen proceedings. We also know about purported inaccuracies in Sorkin's portrayal of the events before, during, and after the creation of Facebook.
There isn't much we don't know about The Social Network. It's a film that seems tailor made to be talked about. To be analyzed. And there's plenty to be discussed. Perhaps what we didn't know about the film, and what we can examine right now in the year 2020, is how it would hold up from years of close scrutiny and an ever-changing societal landscape.
Facebook was a big deal in 2010. It had amassed 500 million users as the film's punchy poster tells us, and was an influential behemoth of a social media platform. However, in an age where Mark Zuckerberg appeared before the United States Congress to testify about Facebook's collection and usage of users' personal data, and when now more than ever people are being confronted with the realities of widespread surveillance and data mining on the part of huge mega-corporations like Facebook and Google, there is a tinge of anachronism that permeates throughout the film upon watching it today.
That's not to say that The Social Network is a bad film. Not by any stretch of the imagination. From a filmmaking perspective, this is a stellar and compelling piece of storytelling with some of the most outstanding screenwriting I've ever encountered. The performances are all top-notch. David Fincher's direction is excellent. There's nothing wrong with this movie from an objective viewpoint, and as a work of art, it can still be enjoyed as well today as when it was first released.
With that said, I believe it will increasingly become something of a period piece, a snapshot of a bygone era when social media was not as pernicious and complicated. But it's important not to lose sight of how and why things happen. The past can be distorted. History can be misremembered, if we let it. For this reason, The Social Network will endure as an important historical document. And an exceptionally entertaining one at that.
submitted by SimonSays18 to Ijustwatched [link] [comments]


2020.05.06 21:29 paigemarie546 Anyone else feel like this sub is constantly trolled by Barstool people in violation of rules #1, #5, #6 and #7? Do we actually have moderators?

I honestly feel like there are a ton of sexist "stoolies" constantly trolling this sub to tear down the reputation of Alex and Sofia... and as Reddit doesn't really have the same demographic as CHD, it has clearly been pretty easy to do.
  1. These would be the people consistently referring to Alex and Sofia as "girls" (reinforcing the idea of naivety, despite the fact that they're both adult women who are proven successes in their professional careers). → see rules #5 & #7
  2. These would be the people reducing the daddies' vibrant, innovative personalities to the offensive and disrespectful dumb blonde sorority girl stereotype... which should also not be so prevalent on this board. (And for those who say they aren't innovative, fuck off back to your sexist, male-gaze driven media. This sub isn't for you.) → see rules #1, #5, #6 
  3. The people repeatedly claiming and suggesting that Alex and Sofia are replaceable (a common tactic abusive partners AND employers use to make people feel trapped)... because if you truly think that, see above. → see rule #5
  4. The people posting about cancelling or unfollowing them because of the lack of podcasts (which seems to be a legal issue and is also ridiculous... people don't unfollow Beyonce because she hasn't put out an album in a few years). Sure, maybe one thread to discuss this -- but what point does it serve? None. They're posted by trolls or people who are now doubting the daddies because of the effectiveness of the trolls. → see rules #5, #6
  5. And my personal favorite, the people (who have never seen the actual contract between these women and Barstool Sports) demanding that their constant presence in the Barstool office is MANDATORY. → see rule #6
In very simple terms, so ignoring the fact that they are above-the-line) talent with a combined nearly 2 million followers on their personal Instagrams, Alex and Sofia write the podcasts and present them verbally to an audience: they are entertainers, artists and writers -- regardless of your view on the quality of their work.
The answer to all of the above is, unequivocally, NONE. (Though if this was the case, we might finally have Winds of Winter.) So why are people claiming that the hosts of Barstool's second-highest grossing podcast MUST work in an office full of people, distractions and general fuckery? Was there really an issue with the content of the podcasts, pre-trail? Maybe you think so, but the numbers don't lie in this case: they were killing it the way they were working before. Did Portnoy snapchat you the fine print of their contract? No? Then stop the fucking pseudo-doxxing. → see rules #1, #5, #6 & #7


As a final aside, please remember that we live in a wonderfully sexist world where the unconscious bias of most people is that women are replaceable: they have no work ethic and their worth is reduced to the quality of pleasure they can provide the male gaze. If they see success, it is because of a man. If they stand up for themselves, they have no right to do so. If they don't fall in line, they're bitches who deserve to have their careers torpedo'd.
Sound familiar to anyone?
#MeToo.


I vote that the mods help manage the trolls against the sexist rhetoric that has been taking over this sub. If you want to "cancel" CHD, unfollow them or bitch about how they are entitled and have no work ethic because they haven't put a podcast out -- go do it on Barstool's sub.
Opinions are great.
Trolling the fuck out of this sub with sexist, bitch boy values to make yourself feel superior is pathetic and against rules #1, #5, #6 & #7.
I'm sure there are other ways to fill up all of that mandatory blogging time.
submitted by paigemarie546 to CallHerDaddy [link] [comments]


2020.04.16 22:54 memphis_violist The Social Network (2010)

I recently watched The Social Network for the first time and I loved it so much that I decided that I would write my first ever movie review on this movie. I hope you guys like it, and feedback is very much appreciated since I hope to start doing this more often in the future.
The Social Network is a 2010 film written by Aaron Sorkin and directed by David Fincher about the founding of Facebook and the fallout between Mark Zuckerberg and his business partners. At first glance, the synopsis for this film may put off some people, especially considering what the public knows about Zuckerberg in 2020, but at the heart of this story is the story of a friendship between Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) and Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield) and what happens when conflicting business ideals and selfish ambitions destroy a lifelong friendship. Eisenberg, Garfield, Justin Timberlake, and Armie Hammer are all excellent in this film, and Eisenberg definitely deserved his Oscar nomination for this role.
Despite the stellar acting performances, though, Sorkin's Academy Award-winning screenplay is the clear standout of this film, as the dialogue is fast-paced and engaging, and the result is a mesmerizing well-crafted story of how Facebook became the juggernaut company that the public knows today. The non-linear storytelling of this film makes for an interesting stream-of-consciousness structure that jumps between dialogue from court settlements in the "present-day" (2010) and the stories the characters tell from their point-of-view of how Facebook was founded (2003-2010).
This is a film that gives insight into how one of the most successful modern-day businesses was founded, and this highly-engaging comedic drama has something for everyone to enjoy. I give this film an A+ rating, and it is by far one of my new favorite films that I will definitely be watching again and again.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1285016/
submitted by memphis_violist to iwatchedanoldmovie [link] [comments]


2020.04.01 12:08 longhigy Selling all the released Masterclass classes: Kelly Wearstler Teaches Interior Design, Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana TEACH MIXOLOGY, RUPAUL SELF-EXPRESSION AND AUTHENTICITY, Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein, GABRIELA CÁMARA MEXICAN COOKING, etc.

Kelly Wearstler Teaches Interior Design
Eclectic and experiential, Kelly Wearstler’s style helped redefine modern American design and influenced the rise of designer hotels. Now the award-winning designer takes you behind the scenes to demystify interior design. Make any space feel larger, and choose colors, materials, and textures with confidence. Curate collections of art and objects, cultivate your own distinct style, and create spaces that tell a story.
Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana TEACH MIXOLOGY
Meet Your Instructors: Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana A leader in the New York City–based craft cocktail movement, Lynnette Marrero is the bar director at the Llama Inn in Brooklyn. Nicknamed “Mr Lyan,” Ryan Chetiyawardana has opened award-winning bars around the world.
RUPAUL TEACHES SELF-EXPRESSION AND AUTHENTICITY RuPaul has transformed drag subculture into a mainstream phenomenon with devoted fans across the world. Now the Emmy-winning host, performer, and drag icon is sharing an intimate look at his personal journey to self-realization. From finding your inner truth to owning the room, RuPaul teaches you how to present your best self to the world. It’s your life’s work to shine—RuPaul shows you how. JEFF GOODBY & RICH SILVERSTEIN TEACH ADVERTISING AND CREATIVITY Meet Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein, founders of the legendary advertising agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners. Jeff and Rich introduce themselves and set the stage for their class.
Gabriela Camara MEXICAN COOKING Meet your new instructor: internationally acclaimed chef and restaurateur Gabriela Cámara. Gabriela shares how she became a chef, the origin story of her famed restaurant Contramar in Mexico City, and her philosophy on food and hospitality.
Neil deGrasse Tyson Teaches Scientific Thinking and Communication
With a hit talk show and bestselling books, Neil deGrasse Tyson is one of the most popular figures in modern science. Now the influential astrophysicist teaches you how his mind works and how he connects with audiences. Learn to think like a skeptic, open your own mind through scientific literacy, distill data, and navigate bias to discover objective truths—and deliver your ideas in ways that engage, excite, and inspire.
CHRIS VOSSTEACHES THE ART OF NEGOTIATION
Meet your new instructor: former FBI lead international kidnapping negotiator Chris Voss. While many believe that negotiation is a battle, Chris sees successful negotiation as a collaboration rooted in empathy.
MISTY COPELAND TEACHES BALLET TECHNIQUE AND ARTISTRY
American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Misty Copeland teaches you how to build your technique, embrace your story, and own your movement.
Doris Kearns Goodwin Teaches U.S. Presidential History and Leadership
Meet your instructor: Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and bestselling author Doris Kearns Goodwin. She talks about why she’s excited to teach this class, how she came to love history, and her path to becoming a presidential historian.
BOBBI BROWN TEACHES MAKEUP AND BEAUTY Bobbi Brown teaches you the tips, tricks, and techniques for applying simple, natural makeup that makes you feel beautiful in your own skin.
BOB IGER TEACHES BUSINESS STRATEGY AND LEADERSHIP
Meet your new instructor: chairman and CEO Bob Iger. In his introduction, Bob talks about what he’s learned from great teachers and what he wants to share with you.
THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS
In his third MasterClass, Chef Thomas Keller focuses on preparing fresh seafood like lobster and salmon, making classic desserts such as apple pie and lemon tart, and showing how sous vide cooking can be done at home to enhance flavor and texture. Whether you’re a beginning or advanced cook, you’ll learn the techniques and principles that will give you the understanding and skills to get the most delicious results.
DANNY ELFMAN TEACHES MUSIC FOR FILM
From The Simpsons theme to the soundtracks of Tim Burton’s Pee-wee’s Big Adventure and The Nightmare Before Christmas, Danny Elfman’s compositions are original, memorable, and exuberantly weird. Now the Oingo Boingo founder and four-time Oscar nominee shares his unconventional (and uncensored) creative process. Step into Danny’s studio and learn his techniques for evoking emotion and elevating a story through music.
SARA BLAKELY TEACHES SELF-MADE ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Meet your instructor: self-made billionaire and founder of Spanx, Sara Blakely. Sara talks about her journey as an inventor and entrepreneur, sharing that her purpose is to serve women and make products for women better.
From now i'll sell a cooking pack for $10 which includes
Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Alice Waters - Home Cooking Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
For $15 you'll get EVERYTHING
Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Aaron Sorkin – Screenwriting Alice Waters - Home Cooking Annie Leibovitz - Photography Armin Van Buuren - Dance Music Billy Collins - Teaches Reading and Writing Poetry Bob Woodward - Investigative Journalism Carlos Santana Teaches The Art And Soul Of Guitar Chris Hadfield Teaches Space Exploration Christina Aguilera - Teaches Singing Dan Brown Teaches Writing Thrillers Daniel Negreanu Teaches Poker David Axelrod and Karl Rove Teach Campaign Strategy David Lynch - Teaches Creativity and Film David Mamet - Dramatic Writing Deadmau5 - Electronic Music Production Diane von Furstenberg - Building a Fashion Brand Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Dr. Jane Goodall Teaches Conservation Dustin Hoffman - Acting Frank Gehry - Design and Architecture Garry Kasparov - Chess Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home Hans Zimmer - Film Scoring Helen Mirren - Acting Herbie Hancock - Jazz Howard Schultz about leading a values-based business Itzhak Perlman teches violin James Patterson - Writing James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation Jane Goodall - Conservation Jimmy Chin Photography Jodie Foster teaches filmmaking Joyce Carol Oates Teaches the Art of the Short Story Judd Apatow Teaches Comedy Judy Blume Teaches Writing Ken Burns Teaches Documentary Filmmaking Kevin Spacey - Acting Malcolm Gladwell Teaches Writing Marc Jacobs - Fashion Design Margaret Atwood Teaches Creative Writing Martin Scorsese - Filmmaking Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Mira Nair Teaches Independent Filmmaking Neil Gaiman Teaches the Art of Storytelling PAUL KRUGMAN TEACHES ECONOMICS AND SOCIETY Penn and Teller - Teach the Art of Magic PHIL IVEY TEACHES POKER STRATEGY Reba McEntire - Country Music Reba McEntire Teaches Country Music Ron Howard - Directing Samuel L. Jackson Teaches Acting Serena Williams - Tennis Shonda Rhimes Teaches Writing for Television Spike Lee Teaches Independent Filmmaking Stephen Curry Teaches Basketball Steve Martin - Comedy Stine teaches Writing for young Audiences Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces Timbaland - Teaches Producing and Beatmaking Tom Morello Teaches Electric Guitar Usher - The Art of Performance Werner Herzog Teaches Filmmaking Will Wright Teaches Game Design and Theory Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
After payment you'll get a google drive link with the selected class/es !
I have lots of other interesting stuff you might need(audiobooks, courses, fitness programs, business stuff, rare shows etc I have HQ courses from Jordan Belfort , Ezra Firestone, Iman Gadzhi, Wall street stuff, photography courses, musicmaking samples VST's DAW's plugins sample banks etc, almost anything you can imagine!
submitted by longhigy to forsale [link] [comments]


2020.03.06 14:04 longhigy Selling all the released Masterclass classes: Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana TEACH MIXOLOGY, RUPAUL SELF-EXPRESSION AND AUTHENTICITY, Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein, GABRIELA CÁMARA MEXICAN COOKING, etc. for $20 paypal

https://www.masterclass.com/
Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana TEACH MIXOLOGY
Meet Your Instructors: Lynnette Marrero & Ryan Chetiyawardana A leader in the New York City–based craft cocktail movement, Lynnette Marrero is the bar director at the Llama Inn in Brooklyn. Nicknamed “Mr Lyan,” Ryan Chetiyawardana has opened award-winning bars around the world.
RUPAUL TEACHES SELF-EXPRESSION AND AUTHENTICITY RuPaul has transformed drag subculture into a mainstream phenomenon with devoted fans across the world. Now the Emmy-winning host, performer, and drag icon is sharing an intimate look at his personal journey to self-realization. From finding your inner truth to owning the room, RuPaul teaches you how to present your best self to the world. It’s your life’s work to shine—RuPaul shows you how. JEFF GOODBY & RICH SILVERSTEIN TEACH ADVERTISING AND CREATIVITY Meet Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein, founders of the legendary advertising agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners. Jeff and Rich introduce themselves and set the stage for their class.
Gabriela Camara MEXICAN COOKING Meet your new instructor: internationally acclaimed chef and restaurateur Gabriela Cámara. Gabriela shares how she became a chef, the origin story of her famed restaurant Contramar in Mexico City, and her philosophy on food and hospitality.
Neil deGrasse Tyson Teaches Scientific Thinking and Communication
With a hit talk show and bestselling books, Neil deGrasse Tyson is one of the most popular figures in modern science. Now the influential astrophysicist teaches you how his mind works and how he connects with audiences. Learn to think like a skeptic, open your own mind through scientific literacy, distill data, and navigate bias to discover objective truths—and deliver your ideas in ways that engage, excite, and inspire.
CHRIS VOSSTEACHES THE ART OF NEGOTIATION
Meet your new instructor: former FBI lead international kidnapping negotiator Chris Voss. While many believe that negotiation is a battle, Chris sees successful negotiation as a collaboration rooted in empathy.
MISTY COPELAND TEACHES BALLET TECHNIQUE AND ARTISTRY
American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Misty Copeland teaches you how to build your technique, embrace your story, and own your movement.
Doris Kearns Goodwin Teaches U.S. Presidential History and Leadership
Meet your instructor: Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and bestselling author Doris Kearns Goodwin. She talks about why she’s excited to teach this class, how she came to love history, and her path to becoming a presidential historian.
BOBBI BROWN TEACHES MAKEUP AND BEAUTY Bobbi Brown teaches you the tips, tricks, and techniques for applying simple, natural makeup that makes you feel beautiful in your own skin.
BOB IGER TEACHES BUSINESS STRATEGY AND LEADERSHIP
Meet your new instructor: chairman and CEO Bob Iger. In his introduction, Bob talks about what he’s learned from great teachers and what he wants to share with you.
THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS
In his third MasterClass, Chef Thomas Keller focuses on preparing fresh seafood like lobster and salmon, making classic desserts such as apple pie and lemon tart, and showing how sous vide cooking can be done at home to enhance flavor and texture. Whether you’re a beginning or advanced cook, you’ll learn the techniques and principles that will give you the understanding and skills to get the most delicious results.
DANNY ELFMAN TEACHES MUSIC FOR FILM
From The Simpsons theme to the soundtracks of Tim Burton’s Pee-wee’s Big Adventure and The Nightmare Before Christmas, Danny Elfman’s compositions are original, memorable, and exuberantly weird. Now the Oingo Boingo founder and four-time Oscar nominee shares his unconventional (and uncensored) creative process. Step into Danny’s studio and learn his techniques for evoking emotion and elevating a story through music.
SARA BLAKELY TEACHES SELF-MADE ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Meet your instructor: self-made billionaire and founder of Spanx, Sara Blakely. Sara talks about her journey as an inventor and entrepreneur, sharing that her purpose is to serve women and make products for women better.
From now i'll sell a cooking pack for $15 which includes
Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Alice Waters - Home Cooking Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
For $20 you'll get EVERYTHING
Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Aaron Sorkin – Screenwriting Alice Waters - Home Cooking Annie Leibovitz - Photography Armin Van Buuren - Dance Music Billy Collins - Teaches Reading and Writing Poetry Bob Woodward - Investigative Journalism Carlos Santana Teaches The Art And Soul Of Guitar Chris Hadfield Teaches Space Exploration Christina Aguilera - Teaches Singing Dan Brown Teaches Writing Thrillers Daniel Negreanu Teaches Poker David Axelrod and Karl Rove Teach Campaign Strategy David Lynch - Teaches Creativity and Film David Mamet - Dramatic Writing Deadmau5 - Electronic Music Production Diane von Furstenberg - Building a Fashion Brand Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Dr. Jane Goodall Teaches Conservation Dustin Hoffman - Acting Frank Gehry - Design and Architecture Garry Kasparov - Chess Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home Hans Zimmer - Film Scoring Helen Mirren - Acting Herbie Hancock - Jazz Howard Schultz about leading a values-based business Itzhak Perlman teches violin James Patterson - Writing James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation Jane Goodall - Conservation Jimmy Chin Photography Jodie Foster teaches filmmaking Joyce Carol Oates Teaches the Art of the Short Story Judd Apatow Teaches Comedy Judy Blume Teaches Writing Ken Burns Teaches Documentary Filmmaking Kevin Spacey - Acting Malcolm Gladwell Teaches Writing Marc Jacobs - Fashion Design Margaret Atwood Teaches Creative Writing Martin Scorsese - Filmmaking Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Mira Nair Teaches Independent Filmmaking Neil Gaiman Teaches the Art of Storytelling PAUL KRUGMAN TEACHES ECONOMICS AND SOCIETY Penn and Teller - Teach the Art of Magic PHIL IVEY TEACHES POKER STRATEGY Reba McEntire - Country Music Reba McEntire Teaches Country Music Ron Howard - Directing Samuel L. Jackson Teaches Acting Serena Williams - Tennis Shonda Rhimes Teaches Writing for Television Spike Lee Teaches Independent Filmmaking Stephen Curry Teaches Basketball Steve Martin - Comedy Stine teaches Writing for young Audiences Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces Timbaland - Teaches Producing and Beatmaking Tom Morello Teaches Electric Guitar Usher - The Art of Performance Werner Herzog Teaches Filmmaking Will Wright Teaches Game Design and Theory Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
After payment you'll get a google drive link with the selected class/es !
submitted by longhigy to forsale [link] [comments]


2020.03.03 06:42 BrainTrainingonline Mark Zuckerberg Entrepreneur

Imprint Zuckerberg is prime supporter and CEO of the long range interpersonal communication site Facebook, just as one of the world's most youthful very rich people.

Who Is Mark Zuckerberg?

Imprint Zuckerberg helped to establish the long range interpersonal communication site Facebook out of his school apartment at Harvard University. Zuckerberg left school after his sophomore year to focus on the site, the client base of which has developed to in excess of two billion individuals, making Zuckerberg an extremely rich person many occasions over. The introduction of Facebook was depicted in the 2010 film The Social Network.

Early Life

Zuckerberg was conceived on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, into an agreeable, knowledgeable family. He was brought up in the close by town of Dobbs Ferry.

Zuckerberg's dad, Edward Zuckerberg, ran a dental practice joined to the family's home. His mom, Karen, filled in as a therapist before the introduction of the couple's four youngsters — Mark, Randi, Donna and Arielle.

Zuckerberg built up an enthusiasm for PCs at an early age; when he was around 12, he utilized Atari BASIC to make an informing program he named "Zucknet." His dad utilized the program in his dental office, so the secretary could illuminate him regarding another patient without shouting over the room. The family additionally utilized Zucknet to impart inside the house.

Together with his companions, he likewise made PC games for no particular reason. "I had a lot of companions who were craftsmen," he said. "They'd come over, draw stuff, and I'd fabricate a game out of it."

Imprint Zuckerberg's Education

To stay aware of Zuckerberg's blossoming enthusiasm for PCs, his folks procured private PC coach David Newman to go to the house once every week and work with Zuckerberg. Newman later advised correspondents that it was difficult to remain in front of the wonder, who started taking alumni courses at close by Mercy College around this equivalent time.

Zuckerberg later learned at Phillips Exeter Academy, a selective private academy in New Hampshire. There he demonstrated ability in fencing, turning into the skipper of the school's group. He likewise exceeded expectations in writing, winning a certificate in works of art.

However Zuckerberg stayed captivated by PCs and kept on chipping away at growing new projects. While still in secondary school, he made an early form of the music programming Pandora, which he called Synapse.

A few organizations—including AOL and Microsoft—communicated an enthusiasm for purchasing the product, and contracting the youngster before graduation. He declined the offers.

Imprint Zuckerberg's College Experience

Subsequent to moving on from Exeter in 2002, Zuckerberg enlisted at Harvard University. After his sophomore year, Zuckerberg dropped out of school to give himself to his new organization, Facebook, full time.

By his sophomore year at the Ivy League establishment, he had built up a notoriety for being the go-to programming designer nearby. It was around then that he constructed a program called CourseMatch, which helped understudies pick their classes dependent on the course determinations of different clients.

He additionally developed Facemash, which looked at the photos of two understudies nearby and permitted clients to decide on which one was increasingly appealing. The program turned out to be uncontrollably mainstream, however was later closed somewhere around the school organization after it was considered improper.

In light of the buzz of his past tasks, three of his kindred understudies—Divya Narendra, and twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss—searched him out to take a shot at a thought for a long range informal communication site they called Harvard Connection. This site was intended to utilize data from Harvard's understudy arranges so as to make a dating site for the Harvard first class.

Zuckerberg consented to help with the venture, yet before long dropped out to take a shot at his own informal communication site, The Facebook.

Imprint Zuckerberg and Founding Facebook

Zuckerberg and his companions Dustin Moskovitz, Chris Hughes and Eduardo Saverin made The Facebook, a site that permitted clients to make their own profiles, transfer photographs, and speak with different clients. The gathering forced the site to leave an apartment at Harvard University until June 2004.

That year Zuckerberg dropped out of school and moved the organization to Palo Alto, California. Before the finish of 2004, Facebook had 1 million clients.

In 2005, Zuckerberg's endeavor got an immense lift from the investment firm Accel Partners. Accel put $12.7 million into the system, which at the time was open just to Ivy League understudies.

Zuckerberg's organization at that point conceded access to different universities, secondary school and global schools, pushing the site's participation to more than 5.5 million clients by December 2005. The site started pulling in light of a legitimate concern for different organizations that needed to publicize with the well known social center.

Not having any desire to sell out, Zuckerberg diverted down ideas from organizations, for example, Yahoo! also, MTV Networks. Rather, he concentrated on extending the site, opening up his undertaking to outside designers and including more highlights.

'Harvard Connection' and Legal Hurdles

Zuckerberg appeared to be going no place yet up. Be that as it may, in 2006, the business head honcho confronted his first huge obstacle: the makers of Harvard Connection asserted that Zuckerberg took their thought, and demanded the product engineer expected to pay for their business misfortunes.

Zuckerberg kept up that the thoughts depended on two totally different sorts of interpersonal organizations. After legal advisors looked through Zuckerberg's records, implicating texts uncovered that Zuckerberg may have deliberately taken the licensed innovation of Harvard Connection and offered Facebook clients' private data to his companions.

Zuckerberg later apologized for the implicating messages, saying he lamented them. "In case you will proceed to construct a help that is persuasive and that many individuals depend on, at that point you should be developed, right?" he said in a meeting with The New Yorker. "I think I've developed and taken in a great deal."

Albeit an underlying settlement of $65 million was come to between the two gatherings, the legitimate disagreement about the issue proceeded with well into 2011, after Narendra and the Winklevosses asserted they were deceived concerning the estimation of their stock.

DOWNLOAD BIOGRAPHY'S MARK ZUCKERBERG FACT CARD

Imprint Zuckerberg Fact Card

'The Social Network' Movie

In 2010, screenwriter Aaron Sorkin's film The Social Network was discharged. The widely praised film got eight Academy Award selections.

Sorkin's screenplay depended on the 2009 book The Accidental Billionaires, by essayist Ben Mezrich. Mezrich was vigorously reprimanded for his re-recounting Zuckerberg's story, which utilized created scenes, rethought exchange and anecdotal characters.

Zuckerberg questioned the film's account, and later told a correspondent at The New Yorker that a considerable lot of the subtleties in the film were wrong. For instance, Zuckerberg had been dating his long-lasting sweetheart since 2003. He additionally said he was never keen on joining any of the last clubs.

"It's intriguing what stuff they concentrated on getting right; like, each and every shirt and wool that I had in that film is really a shirt or downy that I claim," Zuckerberg told a journalist at a startup gathering in 2010. "So there's so much stuff that they got off-base and a lot of irregular subtleties that they got right."

However Zuckerberg and Facebook kept on succeeding, notwithstanding the analysis. Time magazine named him Person of the Year in 2010, and Vanity Fair put him at the highest point of their New Establishment list.

Facebook IPO

In May 2012, Facebook had its first sale of stock, which raised $16 billion, making it the greatest Internet IPO ever.

After the underlying achievement of the IPO, the Facebook stock cost dropped fairly in the beginning of exchanging, however Zuckerberg is relied upon to climate any good and bad times in his organization's market execution.

In 2013, Facebook made the Fortune 500 rundown just because—making Zuckerberg, at 28 years old, the most youthful CEO on the rundown.

Counterfeit News and Cambridge Analytica Scandal

Zuckerberg was condemned for the multiplication of phony news posts on his site paving the way to the 2016 U.S. presidential political race. In mid 2018, he reported an individual test to create improved strategies for guarding Facebook clients from misuse and impedance by country states. (Past close to home difficulties started in New Year's 2009 and have included just eating meat he executed himself and figuring out how to communicate in Mandarin.)

"We won't forestall all mix-ups or misuse, however we right now make an excessive number of mistakes upholding our approaches and forestalling abuse of our instruments," he composed on his Facebook page. "On the off chance that we're fruitful this year, at that point we'll end 2018 on a greatly improved direction."

Zuckerberg experienced harsh criticism again a couple of months after the fact when it was uncovered that Cambridge Analytica, an information firm with connections to President Donald Trump's 2016 battle, had utilized private data from around 87 million Facebook profiles without the interpersonal organization cautioning its proprietors. The subsequent clamor appeared to shake speculators' trust in Facebook, its offers dropping by 15 percent after the news got open.

Following a couple of days' quietness, Zuckerberg surfaced on different outlets to clarify how the organization was finding a way to confine outsider designers' entrance to client data, and said he would be glad to affirm before Congress.

On Sunday, March 25, Facebook took out full-page advertisements in seven British and three American papers, wrote as an individual statement of regret from Zuckerberg. He guaranteed the organization would explore the entirety of its applications, and remind clients which ones they can close off. "I'm sorry we didn't accomplish more at that point," he composed. "I guarantee to improve the situation for you."

In the midst of expanding requires his acquiescence from speculator gatherings, Zuckerberg made a trip to Capitol Hill and met with administrators in front of his two-day declaration, planned for April 10 and 11. The main day of hearings, with the Senate Commerce and
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2020.02.28 14:30 PoeDamn2 How can you be in the same page with your screenwriter partner?

For example I think that choosing various films to get inspired by would help so my partner and I we’re in the same page without doing something different, but that’s only my guess.
How are you in the same page as your screenwriter partner?
Another question off topic is how do I improve my writing? I’ve read script books and seeing a masterclass of Aaron Sorkin.
submitted by PoeDamn2 to Screenwriting [link] [comments]


2020.02.24 12:50 longhigy [H]All the released Masterclass classes: RUPAUL SELF-EXPRESSION AND AUTHENTICITY, Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein, GABRIELA CÁMARA MEXICAN COOKING, Neil deGrasse Tyson Scientific Thinking, Chriss Voss Negotiation etc. [W] $2 Paypal each, $15 for EVERYTHING or Dark souls remastered steam key

Please check my post history for other interesting stuff you might need(audiobooks, courses, fitness programs, business stuff, rare shows etc I have HQ courses from Jordan Belfort , Ezra Firestone, Iman Gadzhi, Wall street stuff, photography courses, musicmaking samples VST's DAW's plugins sample banks etc, almost anything you can imagine!
RUPAUL TEACHES SELF-EXPRESSION AND AUTHENTICITY RuPaul has transformed drag subculture into a mainstream phenomenon with devoted fans across the world. Now the Emmy-winning host, performer, and drag icon is sharing an intimate look at his personal journey to self-realization. From finding your inner truth to owning the room, RuPaul teaches you how to present your best self to the world. It’s your life’s work to shine—RuPaul shows you how. JEFF GOODBY & RICH SILVERSTEIN TEACH ADVERTISING AND CREATIVITY Meet Jeff Goodby and Rich Silverstein, founders of the legendary advertising agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners. Jeff and Rich introduce themselves and set the stage for their class.
Gabriela Camara MEXICAN COOKING Meet your new instructor: internationally acclaimed chef and restaurateur Gabriela Cámara. Gabriela shares how she became a chef, the origin story of her famed restaurant Contramar in Mexico City, and her philosophy on food and hospitality.
Neil deGrasse Tyson Teaches Scientific Thinking and Communication
With a hit talk show and bestselling books, Neil deGrasse Tyson is one of the most popular figures in modern science. Now the influential astrophysicist teaches you how his mind works and how he connects with audiences. Learn to think like a skeptic, open your own mind through scientific literacy, distill data, and navigate bias to discover objective truths—and deliver your ideas in ways that engage, excite, and inspire.
CHRIS VOSSTEACHES THE ART OF NEGOTIATION
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MISTY COPELAND TEACHES BALLET TECHNIQUE AND ARTISTRY
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Doris Kearns Goodwin Teaches U.S. Presidential History and Leadership
Meet your instructor: Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and bestselling author Doris Kearns Goodwin. She talks about why she’s excited to teach this class, how she came to love history, and her path to becoming a presidential historian.
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BOB IGER TEACHES BUSINESS STRATEGY AND LEADERSHIP
Meet your new instructor: chairman and CEO Bob Iger. In his introduction, Bob talks about what he’s learned from great teachers and what he wants to share with you.
THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS
In his third MasterClass, Chef Thomas Keller focuses on preparing fresh seafood like lobster and salmon, making classic desserts such as apple pie and lemon tart, and showing how sous vide cooking can be done at home to enhance flavor and texture. Whether you’re a beginning or advanced cook, you’ll learn the techniques and principles that will give you the understanding and skills to get the most delicious results.
DANNY ELFMAN TEACHES MUSIC FOR FILM
From The Simpsons theme to the soundtracks of Tim Burton’s Pee-wee’s Big Adventure and The Nightmare Before Christmas, Danny Elfman’s compositions are original, memorable, and exuberantly weird. Now the Oingo Boingo founder and four-time Oscar nominee shares his unconventional (and uncensored) creative process. Step into Danny’s studio and learn his techniques for evoking emotion and elevating a story through music.
SARA BLAKELY TEACHES SELF-MADE ENTREPRENEURSHIP
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Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Alice Waters - Home Cooking Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces THOMAS KELLER TEACHES COOKING TECHNIQUES III: SEAFOOD, SOUS VIDE, AND DESSERTS Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
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Aaron Franklin - Teaches Texas-Style BBQ Aaron Sorkin – Screenwriting Alice Waters - Home Cooking Annie Leibovitz - Photography Armin Van Buuren - Dance Music Billy Collins - Teaches Reading and Writing Poetry Bob Woodward - Investigative Journalism Carlos Santana Teaches The Art And Soul Of Guitar Chris Hadfield Teaches Space Exploration Christina Aguilera - Teaches Singing Dan Brown Teaches Writing Thrillers Daniel Negreanu Teaches Poker David Axelrod and Karl Rove Teach Campaign Strategy David Lynch - Teaches Creativity and Film David Mamet - Dramatic Writing Deadmau5 - Electronic Music Production Diane von Furstenberg - Building a Fashion Brand Dominique Ansel teaches french pastry fundamentals Dr. Jane Goodall Teaches Conservation Dustin Hoffman - Acting Frank Gehry - Design and Architecture Garry Kasparov - Chess Gordon Ramsay - Cooking Gordon Ramsay Teaches Cooking II: Restaurant Recipes at Home Hans Zimmer - Film Scoring Helen Mirren - Acting Herbie Hancock - Jazz Howard Schultz about leading a values-based business Itzhak Perlman teches violin James Patterson - Writing James Suckling Teaches Wine Appreciation Jane Goodall - Conservation Jimmy Chin Photography Jodie Foster teaches filmmaking Joyce Carol Oates Teaches the Art of the Short Story Judd Apatow Teaches Comedy Judy Blume Teaches Writing Ken Burns Teaches Documentary Filmmaking Kevin Spacey - Acting Malcolm Gladwell Teaches Writing Marc Jacobs - Fashion Design Margaret Atwood Teaches Creative Writing Martin Scorsese - Filmmaking Massimo Bottura teaches Italian cooking Mira Nair Teaches Independent Filmmaking Neil Gaiman Teaches the Art of Storytelling PAUL KRUGMAN TEACHES ECONOMICS AND SOCIETY Penn and Teller - Teach the Art of Magic PHIL IVEY TEACHES POKER STRATEGY Reba McEntire - Country Music Reba McEntire Teaches Country Music Ron Howard - Directing Samuel L. Jackson Teaches Acting Serena Williams - Tennis Shonda Rhimes Teaches Writing for Television Spike Lee Teaches Independent Filmmaking Stephen Curry Teaches Basketball Steve Martin - Comedy Stine teaches Writing for young Audiences Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Thomas Keller Teaches Cooking Techniques II: Meats, Stocks, Sauces Timbaland - Teaches Producing and Beatmaking Tom Morello Teaches Electric Guitar Usher - The Art of Performance Werner Herzog Teaches Filmmaking Will Wright Teaches Game Design and Theory Wolfgang Puck - Cooking
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2019.12.04 05:33 valkyria_knight881 A Look Into Paramount Pictures 2020: The Turnaround Year?

In this post, I will focus on Paramount Pictures, the studio that couldn’t catch a break for the majority of this decade. Besides that, the studio is well known for Star Trek, Indiana Jones, Forrest Gump, Titanic, Transformers, and Iron Man. Most recently, Paramount has been well known for Mission: Impossible - Fallout, Bumblebee, Rocketman, Dora and the Lost City of Gold, and the upcoming Sonic the Hedgehog film.

The Current Era of Paramount Pictures

In my previous analysis on Paramount Pictures (https://old.reddit.com/boxoffice/comments/9zim0n/other_a_look_into_paramount_pictures_history_2019/), I had different eras that Paramount went through. For most of this decade, Paramount has been in the Decline Era and have been since 2012, Paramount’s 100th Anniversary. By 2014, Paramount lost the distribution rights to Indiana Jones, the Dreamworks Animation films and the Marvel Cinematic Universe, with the latter two being significant to Paramount in the late 2000s and early 2010s up until Paramount’s 100th Anniversary. From 2013 to 2018, Paramount was rotating between Star Trek, Transformers, and Mission: Impossible. Transformers: Age of Extinction ($1.1B) was Paramount’s only billion dollar film and was the highest grossing film of 2014. Paramount was always in last place behind the other major film studios, and they weren’t financially stable. Before we get into how well Paramount is doing this year, let’s see how well they were doing the previous year.

2018

Annihilation - The year started with The Cloverfield Paradox being thrown off to Netflix. And that’s probably a good thing because people said the movie was awful, especially compared to the previous Cloverfield films. In terms of theatrically, the year really started with Annihilation, which was released later in February. Annihilation was only released in theaters in the US, Canada, and China, while every other country got the film on Netflix. Assuming Netflix paid for half of the film, Annihilation made $43M on a budget of $20M ($40M-$55M is the original budget), which is okay, but not great, as Paramount was expecting.
Sherlock Gnomes - Disney dumped their scraps on Paramount, and Paramount managed to find Sherlock Gnomes in Disney’s scraps. Even though Gnomeo & Juliet was a success for Disney’s Touchstone, Disney didn’t think they needed that sequel, and Disney made a good call. Sherlock Gnomes made $90M on a budget of $59M, failing to hit the break-even point.
A Quiet Place - April saw the release of A Quiet Place, which made $341M on a budget of $21M. This finally gave Paramount a hit, something they didn’t really have since Daddy’s Home 2.
Book Club - May saw the release of Book Club, which made $104M on a budget of $14M. With those two succeeding, it seemed like Paramount is starting to turn things around. Then Action Point happened.
Action Point - The film was meant to be similar to Johnny Knoxville’s Jackass films, but this one wasn’t as well received as the Jackass films. The film only made $5M on a budget of $19M. It didn’t seem like Paramount cared too much about Action Point with a lack of marketing. But they did care about their next film after Action Point.
Mission: Impossible - Fallout - Mission: Impossible - Fallout was Paramount’s biggest film of the year, and boy did it deliver. The film made $791M worldwide, becoming the highest grossing film in the Mission: Impossible franchise.
Nobody’s Fool - This was made by Paramount Players, a division created by Paramount to work with other Viacom brands like Comedy Central, BET, MTV, and Nickelodeon. As the first film from Paramount Players, it didn’t do that great, but it didn’t flat out bomb. The film made $34M on a budget of $19M, failing to break-even.
Overlord - This would be the last Bad Robot production for Paramount, and it ended on a whimper. The film made $42M on a budget of $38M, barely making more than its budget, failing to profit.
Instant Family - The film made $67M domestically and $121M worldwide on a budget of $48M.
Bumblebee - Paramount attempted to redeem the Transformers franchise with this film after they milked the franchise completely dry with Transformers: The Last Knight, and I think they pulled it off. In terms of financially, it made $127M domestically and $468M worldwide on a budget of $135M. While this would be the lowest grossing Transformers film, it would be profitable for Paramount, compared to the Last Knight, which despite making more than Bumblebee, made Paramount lose $100M. Bumblebee also had to go against Aquaman. I honestly think Paramount should’ve switched the release dates for Instant Family and Bumblebee so Bumblebee went against Fantastic Beasts 2 instead. Instant Family would’ve probably made at least $80M domestically in the December holidays while Bumblebee would’ve probably made at least $140M domestically during the Thanksgiving holiday.
Overall - This year was so much better for Paramount than 2017, but only okay compared to the other film studios. The losses in some films weren’t too bad and the only film that really failed to make its budget back was Action Point, which only cost $19M. Mission: Impossible - Fallout delivered on all fronts, and is Paramount’s only stable franchise. I felt like Paramount missed some opportunities to have better release dates for some of its movies like Overlord being better off with a pre-Halloween release than a November release. Viacom’s Bob Bakish believed that 2019 would be Paramount’s turnaround year. Is what he said back in early 2018 true or is Paramount still the same old loser from the past 6 years?
Biggest Wins: A Quiet Place, Bumblebee, Mission: Impossible - Fallout
Biggest Loses: Sherlock Gnomes, Action Point, Overlord

2019

When I did my analysis on the upcoming Paramount Pictures films last year, there were originally 12 films slated for 2019. Only 7 of those 12 films released that year with Crawl and Playing With Fire sneaking into the 2019 Paramount slate at the last minute. Eli was given to Netflix after Paramount couldn’t figure out how to market the film, and Eli was given a release of October 18, 2019. Are You Afraid of the Dark? has been removed from Paramount’s schedule and became a mini-series on Nickelodeon. Limited Partners (later became Like a Boss), The Rhythm Section, and Sonic the Hedgehog were pushed to 2020 (with the latter having a really good reason to do so). Unlike the other major film studios, Paramount has released all of their films in the 2019 slate as of this post. I actually chose to look into Paramount Pictures later than the other film studios just to see how well Playing With Fire is doing (with the exception of Sony Pictures). That way, I can completely know for sure how the whole year went for Paramount.
What Men Want - Compared to Paramount Players’ first film (Nobody’s Fool), this was a success, making $72M on a budget of $20M. Even though it's a far cry from Mel Gibson’s What Women Want (made $374M), What Men Want’s performance is good enough for Paramount. Unlike Paramount’s next film after What Men Want.
Wonder Park - Like Jimmy Neutron and Barnyard, this was meant to kick start another television series for Nickelodeon by starting with a film. Unlike those two, the film was a box office bomb, making only $120M on a budget of $100M and the television series nowhere to be seen despite debuting in 2019 (with the Netflix/Nickelodeon partnership, I have a feeling that the show will be on Netflix). Paramount shouldn’t have thrown $100M at this project. It’s just way too high for something like this. Illumination films are made for less, yet make so much more. Lowering the budget to even $60M would’ve been enough for the film to break even.
Pet Sematary - Coming off the Stephen King craze, Pet Sematary was a financial success (though not as much of a success as It was), making $112M worldwide on a budget of $21M, almost twice as much as the original 1989 version (made $58M worldwide).
Rocketman - Coming off the recently booming music biopic craze, Rocketman was a financial success (though not as much of a success as Bohemian Rhapsody was), making $195M on a budget of $40M.
Crawl - Despite not being screened to critics early, the film surprisingly got positive reviews and was a commercial success, making $91M on a budget of $14M. Some say it could’ve made more if the film was marketed better with a better shot at $100M worldwide. But what Crawl made was enough to make Paramount happy.
Dora and the Lost City of Gold - One of Paramount’s weirder ideas that actually works, the film made $119M on a budget of $49M. While it is slightly less than Nickelodeon’s Wonder Park ($120M), it’s lower budget was able to make Dora a success while Wonder Park is considered a disaster. And hey, Wonder Park isn’t going to be the only disaster Paramount has this year. There’s supposedly two more.
Gemini Man - Paramount was advertising this film as the action film of the future with a higher frame rate than usual action films. People saw the film and realized that it’s just a dumb gimmick that hurts the film, especially in non-action scenes. The film made $173M on a budget of $138M, becoming a box office bomb and losing the studio as much as $75M. I think there’s a good reason why the film was stuck in development hell for 20 years and its financial performance proves it. And this isn’t even Paramount’s biggest disaster of the year.
Terminator: Dark Fate - Terminator Dark Fate’s performance proves that the franchise has literally met a dark fate as well. I honestly thought that James Cameron returning as producer would help the film be profitable and make as high as $500M worldwide. What made me reconsider was when the budget was revealed and marketing started kicking in. I admit that I enjoyed it as a fun popcorn flick, but I wouldn’t consider it as the definitive sequel to Terminator 2. In fact, Terminator 1 and 2 are good enough as they are. Dark Fate made $250M on a budget of $196M, becoming a box office bomb. Unlike Gemini Man where Paramount lost $75M on its own, at least Paramount spread the pain over to 20th Century Fox as they distributed the film internationally while Paramount distributed the film in the US. The studios lost as much as $130M, which is about $65M each for Paramount and 20th Century Fox.
Playing With Fire - It’s a really good thing that Paramount had a secret weapon when Terminator: Dark Fate was doing terribly. It was originally Sonic the Hedgehog, but the design was so awful that Paramount pushed it back, and everyone liked that. What’s a better way to end off the decade for Paramount than to release Nickelodeon’s Playing With Fire? Based on the trailers and after seeing the film myself, the film tried to be like Instant Family, but a little more family friendly (like less swearing) and having a bunch of firefighters taking care of the kids instead. Instant Family also received the same treatment of being moved forward to November. What a coincidence. The film has so far made $43M on a budget of $30M, which isn’t good as it hasn’t broken even, and most likely won’t. What a nice way to end the year.
Overall - This year’s lineup was just mediocre and worse than 2018. With the exception of Terminator: Dark Fate, none of Paramount’s films were at the top spot. None of Paramount’s films also made over $100M domestic this year, though Rocketman came close with $96M. Paramount just wasn’t being the major film studio it was supposed to be, and it was good at that. Always taking second to whatever big movie was near it. The films with a budget of $50M and less did fine, but the big budget films that bombed really hurt Paramount’s chances of having a decent year. Paramount had the inability of releasing successful big budget films this year. If it weren’t for Wonder Park, Gemini Man, and Terminator: Dark Fate, the lineup would’ve been okay with a lack of major films for the year. Those three brought the lineup down. 2019 was just not the turnaround year that Paramount needed. But being my optimistic self, I believe there may be hope for Paramount coming very soon.
Biggest Wins: What Men Want, Pet Sematary, Rocketman, Crawl, Dora and the Lost City of Gold
Biggest Losses: Wonder Park, Gemini Man, Terminator: Dark Fate

2020

The next year is coming, and it’s time to look at what Paramount has in-store for everyone next year. I’ll try to keep it short (with a basic description of each one if necessary and how well it might do). The numbers I have won’t be accurate, so take it with a grain of salt.

Like a Boss

It’s a comedy film directed by Miguel Arteta and was originally supposed to come out on June 28, 2019. Based on the trailer, this comedy has a very specific target demographic. With Tiffany Haddish as the lead role, I’d compare how well this movie will do to Nobody’s Fool, which made $34M. I see this film making slightly more even with its limited appeal, making $40M domestically and $70M worldwide. I don’t think Paramount expected this to do amazing, especially with the film being pushed back by seven months.

The Rhythm Section

It’s an action thriller film directed by Reed Marano. This seems like an average revenge flick that should be a modest success for Paramount at best, but not a breakout hit, especially since this film has a January release. What makes this more concerning is that the film was pushed back almost a whole year as its original release date was February 22, 2019. I’d say this makes $60M domestically and $140M worldwide.

Sonic the Hedgehog

It’s an adventure comedy film based on the video game character of the same name. With the redesign making people interested and even anticipating the film, I could see this doing well and be the blockbuster Paramount needs after Gemini Man and Terminator: Dark Fate bombed. I’d say this makes $150M domestically (highest grossing video game movie in the US) and $400M worldwide with a shot at $500M worldwide.

A Quiet Place: Part II

It’s a horror film directed by John Krasinski and is the sequel to A Quiet Place. With A Quiet Place being a major success, I see a slight increase happening for the second film. I’d say this makes $200M domestically and $360M worldwide.

The Lovebirds

It’s a romantic comedy film directed by Michael Showalter. The film is about a couple on the verge of breaking up being involved in a murder that they weren’t involved in. Like many comedies in recent years, I don’t see this doing gangbusters, but it should do slightly better than Paramount’s Like A Boss due to most likely having more of an audience. I’d say this makes $50M domestically and $80M worldwide.

Monster Problems

It’s a post-apocalyptic comedy film directed by Michael Matthews. The film is about a young man fighting monsters to meet the girl he loves. The post-apocalyptic comedy part of this film is giving me Zombieland vibes and should probably do about as well as Zombieland or its sequel. I’d say it makes $60M domestically and $100M worldwide.

The Spongebob Movie: Sponge on the Run

It’s an adventure comedy film and is the third Spongebob film, meaning that Spongebob finally has a trilogy after 16 years. With the success of 2015’s Sponge Out of Water, I think Sponge on the Run should have a slight increase over the second one, though the film’s premise seems like a mix of the first Spongebob Squarepants Movie in 2004 and a Spongebob episode where Gary is missing. I’d say this film makes $180M DOM and $350M WW. If Scoob wasn’t releasing just a week apart from this film, I think Sponge on the Run would’ve had a shot at $200M domestically or $400M worldwide.

Top Gun: Maverick

It’s an action drama film directed by Joseph Kosinski and is the sequel to 1986’s Top Gun. I could see this film being Paramount’s biggest film of the year, similar to Tom Cruise’s Mission: Impossible - Fallout back in 2018. I can see Top Gun: Maverick recreate a similar success that Fallout did (Fallout made $220M DOM and $791M WW). I’d say this makes $210M domestically and $800M worldwide.

Infinite

It’s a sci-fi film directed by Antoine Fuqua. The film is about a man who learns that his visions are memories of his past lives. This sounds like a decent and original concept. I could see this starting a new franchise for Paramount if the world is set up well and if the film is good. I’d say this makes $110M domestically and $300M worldwide.

Spell

It’s a horror thriller film about a man who crashes his plane in the middle of nowhere and is discovered by an elderly couple, who may have sinister ideas in mind. This sounds like a horror film that could break out in late August and early September, like 2016’s Don’t Breathe. I’d say this makes $100M domestically and $180M worldwide.

Without Remorse

It’s an action film directed by Stefano Sollima and is based on the Tom Clancy novel of the same name. It’s about a CIA operative that seeks revenge on a drug lord when his girlfriend gets killed. This film should do slightly better than Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit, but this shouldn’t be bad as long as the budget is low (like $50M). I’d say this makes $60M domestically and $150M worldwide.

The Trial of the Chicago 7

It’s a crime drama film directed by Aaron Sorkin. This should be a modest success, but nothing fantastic. Based on Sorkin’s previous film, Molly’s Game, I’d say this makes $60M domestically and $100M worldwide.

Snake Eyes

It’s an action film directed by Robert Schwentke and is the third installment in the G.I.:Joe franchise. This is said to be the origin story of Snake Eyes. It seems like Paramount is taking the Bumblebee route with this franchise by starting at the very beginning with one specific character. Though the director has a spotty track record, I think this should do decently, similar to Bumblebee (if done right). I’d say this makes $110M domestically and $310M worldwide.

Clifford the Big Red Dog

It’s a family comedy film directed by Walt Becker and is based on the book series of the same name. I don’t get why Paramount is making this film, kind of like how people were baffled at the announcement of a Dora the Explorer film (that actually turned out decently). The performance of this would probably be similar to Dora and the Lost City of Gold, but I have a feeling that this film will keep its tone from the books and the show, while Dora changed its style from its transition from tv show to movie. Based on how well Dora and the Lost City of Gold did, I’d say this makes $50M domestically and $100M worldwide. If Dora and the Lost City of Gold didn’t get too much attention, I don’t think Clifford will fare any better.

Coming 2 America

It’s a romantic comedy film directed by Craig Brewer and will be the sequel to Coming to America (it’s going to be so confusing when people say the name. You’re better off saying Coming to America 2). I think this will be successful, especially if the film is a decent follow-up from its predecessor and with it taking advantage of the holiday spot. I’d say this makes $140M domestically and $300M worldwide.

The Tomorrow War

It’s a military sci-fi action war film directed by Chris McKay. With the exception of Mission: Impossible, big budget Skydance films don’t really do amazing, though this could be traced back to a poor quality film. If the film turns out to be good and assuming it’s budget is about as much as Skydance’s Gemini Man, I’d say this makes $150M domestically and $350M worldwide. Either the holidays help this film, or it will not be able to cross the break-even point, assuming the budget for this film is large.
Thoughts on 2020 Slate: This is how you do a good lineup, Paramount. More of these and less of what we got in 2019 (there were fewer films in 2019 than there were supposed to be last year). While none of them will actually make $1B (maybe Top Gun: Maverick, but that’s a stretch), Paramount is actually using their other IP. Unlike 2019, where all of Paramount’s biggest films were wild cards, 2020 has guaranteed successes for Paramount which come in the form of A Quiet Place, Spongebob, Tom Clancy, GI Joe, Coming to America, and especially Top Gun should do well. Sonic should also be successful and may lead to a franchise. Maybe I’m being optimistic, but Paramount may have a chance at cracking $1B domestically, and they haven’t done that since 2014, but that’s mostly due to the amount of films that they are releasing next year, with a total of 16. 2019 may not have been the turnaround year, but 2020 has a good shot at helping Paramount.
The Future - Paramount Animation has two new animated films coming out in 2021 called Rumble and Luck. They also have the Tiger’s Apprentice and Jersey Crabs coming out in 2022. Paranormal Activity is being revived after 6 years. From Hasbro, we are getting a My Little Pony film, Micronauts, and a Dungeons & Dragons film. A Star Trek 4 is supposedly going to happen along with a Quentin Tarantino Star Trek. If Sonic the Hedgehog is a success, I could see Sega partner up with Paramount to make films off of other franchises like Crazy Taxi and Jet Set Radio. Indiana Jones is finally getting its 5th film after multiple delays. While Disney is distributing the film, Paramount is getting studio credit, so they’re bound to get some money from Indiana Jones 5. Paramount picked up Damien Chazelle’s Babylon and should come out December 2021. Mission: Impossible 7 and 8 are happening and are most likely the last two Mission: Impossible films Tom Cruise will be doing.
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2019.07.16 05:38 shitizsrivastava Rd#11 Why a film director has to be a Good reader?

Reading books is a must. There is no denying the fact.
Every story you have heard about people showing up or being in the right place at the right time have one thing in common.
They are wrong and made up.
They eliminate the part where they were desperate, weak and were ready to do anything to get the job and start their stories right from where they got the job.
All those stories are hearsay which you hear from fellow struggling actors and wannabe directors.
Knowing inside stories constitutes one of the most interesting parts of the experience in the film industry and at times makes you passionate and motivate you towards cinema.
Don’t believe in hearsay. That is just random talk done to soothe your mind and it does not affect anything.
To get some verified data, try reading books.
Every great man in history has more or less been a good reader.
If you want to be a film director, a good one, then you have to be a reader.
How else you think you are going to read all those scripts and find the best one from it?
If you are not a good reader then you might end up becoming a director but not a very great one.
I have met directors who don’t even read the scripts.
They rely on their assistants to narrate them the scenes so that they can shoot it. I wonder how they started their career.
It’s either they have good connections or long assistant career.
Do you think they will make good directors?
Never.
Most of these directors are in TV field in which good content does not matter.
Since filmmaking is a specialized field so they never end up becoming a film director because filmmaking requires more meticulous preparation.
Hundreds of hours of writing, reading and re-reading go in before a good film turns out to be good.
I once interviewed the DOP of Rajkumar Hirani, C.K. Muralitharan.
He told me that Rajkumar Hirani and his writing partner Abhijat Joshi goes through more than 300 re-reading and drafting of the same script to make sure there is no fault or loophole in the script.
I believe that if someone goes through that much amount of hard work in making their movies then their films are ought to be a super hit.
None of the films of Hirani is a flop, leave flop, they are all blockbusters.
But why do you need to read books on filmmaking?
  1. To know how others made their films and approached filmmaking?
  2. To know what mistakes other filmmakers did and how you can avoid them.
  3. To know more about films, shot taking, direction and writing.
Being part of any profession there is one thing that everyone must never forget —
The learning should never stop.
Just because you are out of film school or you have managed to make your first film does not mean that you have learned everything about cinema.
Cinema is an art form that has age beyond 100 years now.
There are things that you don’t know and there are things knowing which will make your films not only better but great.
I remember reading books on scriptwriting during my college days because I was interested in filmmaking.
There was a website called Passion for Cinema which would publish film scripts for its readers to read.
I would download them, take their printouts and read then, again and again, to understand how that script was written. Most of those scripts were from Anurag Kashyap.
There is a book by Syd field called “Screenplay: The foundation of Screenwriting” which is considered one of the best books on screenwriting which with the help of a screenplay of Chinatown makes you understand how the story should be written. According to him, the screenplay of Chinatown is one of the greatest screenplays written and he is right about it.
For a filmmaker, you must develop a habit of reading screenplays. They are ubiquitously available on the internet.
Download them and put them into your Kindle, iPad or laptop or whatever gadget you have and start reading them as soon as possible.
Before making The Shining, Stanley Kubrick couldn’t find any book or concept worth devoting his time and talent into.
In his biography written by his assistant, the author narrates how Kubrick would sit in his room entire day and keep reading new books till he found this book by Stephen King called The Shining and decided that it is going to be his next film.
I was once doing an ad film with Anurag Kashyap and one thing I noted about him was that he was continuously reading books throughout the shoot. He would always manage to find time between film direction and read books.
Ever wondered why the great and successful people are not much active on the internet.
It is because they are busy reading books to gather more knowledge and hone their skills.
Reading books gives you more visualization than watching a documentary on the same thing. Visualization is something which is a cornerstone of success for any director.
My biggest asset while reading books was that I got to know that nothing is easy in this world and everything takes its own due course of time.
Some filmmakers start early while some filmmakers start late to make their films.
Ang Lee struggled for six years from age 30 to 36. He was unemployed and kept working on his screenplays and kept polishing them. He submitted his screenplays to few Festivals and won some awards, which further led him to make his films.
The biographies had taught me a lot about film directors, their life, their struggle, their methods and their persistence to make a film.
Some of the best biographies to read are from Satyajit Ray, Andrei Tarkovsky, Kieslowski, Ritwik Ghatak, Martin Scorsese, James Cameron, Steven Spielberg, Robert Rodriguez among others.
You cannot experience everything on film sets and not everyone in the film line will sit with you, help you, guide you in becoming what you want to become.
You need mentors in life. Mentors help you guide in a certain direction and help you show you the way. Books will do the same for you.
Now coming to the practical aspects of how books can help you apart from developing your personality.
When you will be in the film industry people will talk to you about films and if you don’t know anything about the film industry it shows that you are there merely for superficial glamour purposes.
When I first went to Mumbai, I had read hundreds of blogs on filmmaking, read myriads of books and had seen thousands of films so when my first interview happened, I passed it with flying colours. Not only that, I impressed them all.
There were times when I was fortunate to sit with known filmmakers and get to talk to them. Since most of the people at the top of the film industry are avid film buffs and book readers, they were interested in talking to me about cinema theories, philosophies and how it evolved only because I had read so many books, had several anecdotes and trivia to tell.
So many times, it happened with me that due to my borrowed understanding of film writing from books I was given a chance to read scripts and give feedback based on that.
I knew about script structures and everything about them in details and a hundred percent of those times my analysis of the scripts solved their problems and they would keep calling me again and again. Later I started charging money for that. So, can you imagine, reading books helped me developed another source of living? I am not boasting about my skills here as none of this is a natural talent. I had to read numerous books and devote several hours to reach tot his point.
Book also taught me a lot about set blocking. I read a few books on the direction which I researched a lot on blocking of Alfred Hitchcock, who was a master of camera blocking and how the characters move on the screen. So imagine if you go on sets and you see a director setting the actor movements and blocking actors with respect to the camera. A normal person would be clueless about everything but if you had basic, even theoretic knowledge about set blocking, trust me, within two days you will become a pro at it.
The core foundation of developing any art is researching as much about it as possible and then explain it to someone else. If he understands it then you have done a good job. This is not me but Nobel Prize-winning Scientist and Theoretical physicist Feynman who said this.
You need to know how the art has evolved over time. It is not wise to start from beginning and makes the same mistakes that people before you had already made.
One of the best books that you can lay your hand on right now is How to read films. I borrowed the book from someone and I had finished it two times as I loved it so much. This book touches upon pretty much every topic within cinema, be it history, technique, film theory or whatnot.
You should start from reading biographies because they are light to read and then move on to the books which are technical, about art, have philosophy inside it and then read every book that comes near to your Goal.
Reading books gives you the inspiration that you can also do it. It motivates you to go ahead and do it rather than sitting on your ass and brooding how you are going to do it.
While, on one hand, The autobiography of Robert Rodriguez, A Rebel without a Crew, inspired me that I can make my own film in very less money, on the other hand, the biography of James Cameron told me that hard work always pays and if you work really hard to achieve your dream, you can get anything in life.
Reading screenplays taught me how the script must have been first read and then watching the movie on it made me imagine how and what must be going on sets to make those scenes alive. Scenes on paper are nothing but dead words which are made alive by the efforts of the film director, actors and another crew.
I realized my own screenplay style while reading those screenplays. For example, some writers write screenplays in a detailed amount of descriptions (James Cameron) while some writers (Aaron Sorkin) doesn’t write much in the description but are masters of dialogue.
Reading books about filmmaking also separates you from other people who don’t know what goes behind the screen. More than that whenever you will be on sets, you won’t be alien to the majority of things.
The biographies of film directors make you go inside their mind and then you will better understand what was going inside their minds while shooting a particular scene.
While reading the acclaimed director Ritwik Ghatak biography, I realized how great he was. He narrates a scene from his magnum opus Megha Dhake Tara. In that scene, a woman who is tormented from all sides is sitting with her lover. He is about to ditch her and there is the sound of whiplash you hear in the background.
At first, when I saw the film I didn’t notice anything but it affected me. After reading the book I again saw the film and witnessed the scene from another dimension, from the eyes of the director and understood it better.
First time I watched the film from my perspective and the next time I saw it from the perspective of the film director and it educated me with many things which I missed the first time.
Any scene in any film is an amalgamation of visuals, sound, art, acting, editing, camera and hundreds of other things which we feel but are not obvious to us so sometimes you have to get inside the minds of director to understand his film.
I am not just talking about art films but I am also talking about Commercial films where directors often shoot scenes expecting a different effect on the minds of the audience but the audience understands them in a different manner.
Here is a list of books you must begin reading with -
  1. In the Blink of an Eye by Walter Murch
  2. Shooting to Kill by Christine Vachon
  3. On Directing Film by David Mamet
  4. Story: Substance, Structure, Style and The Principles of Screenwriting by Robert McKee
  5. The Filmmaker’s Handbook, 3rd Edition by Steven Ascher & Edward Pincus
  6. Down and Dirty Pictures: Miramax, Sundance, and the Rise of Independent Film by Peter Biskind
  7. The 5 Cs of Cinematography: Motion Picture Filming Techniques by Joseph V. Mascelli
  8. The Techniques of Film Editing by Karel Reisz
  9. Directing: Film Techniques & Aesthetics
  10. How to Shoot a Feature Film for Under $10,000
Here is a list of biographies you must read
  1. Rebel Without a Crew by Robert Rodriguez
  2. Something like an autobiography by Akira Kurosawa
  3. Adventures in the Screen Trade by William Goldman
  4. Kazan on Directing by Elia Kazan
  5. Spike Lee’s Gotta Have It, by Spike Lee
  6. The Magic Lantern, by Ingmar Bergman
  7. Sculpting in Time, by Andrey Tarkovsky
  8. Speaking of Films, by Satyajit Ray
  9. Jean-Luc Godard — Godard on Godard
  10. Luis Buñuel — My Last Sigh
Here is a list of screenplays should begin reading with.
  1. Casablanca
  2. Psycho
  3. Chinatown
  4. The Godfather
  5. American Beauty
  6. Memento
  7. Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind
  8. The Sting
  9. Pulp Fiction
  10. 12 Angry Men
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2019.01.18 21:59 passing_strangers Please help type me. thank you.

How old are you? What's your gender? Give us a general description of yourself.
I am female, 22. I graduated college magna cum laude in mass communications and political science with minors in legal studies, theatre studies, and advertising. Right out of college, I began working on a political campaign, helping mostly with communications, but other things as well. I am pretty introverted, and I appreciate external consistency ( mass transit, class schedules, work) I don’t like down time/boredom, so I try to fill it as much as possible. One of my favorite things about the election season was when I would get home pretty late, and just be able to go to bed early. I then became accustomed to waking up early, which made me more productive on the weekends. I live in a city, which I like, because everything is accessible. I don’t drive - I never really liked it, and I don’t trust other people driving - maybe because the only vehicle I’ve ever felt truly in control of is my bicycle, and i see car crashes on TV all the time, and I saw one in real life when I was 9ish. I am very self sufficient; I do not like to ask for help, because I don’t want to be seen as lacking. I like to know about everything that I care about, which is mostly related to politics, geography, and pop culture (Aaron sorkin writes the best TV). I do not care about sports, though I am pleased whenever I see the patriots or the red sox win, because I grew up in Rhode Island (and being in college in northern delaware when the eagles won the super bowl was maybe the most obnoxious behavior I have ever seen on a massive scale.)
Is there a medical diagnosis that impact your mental/comportamental stability somehow?
No
Describe your upbringing. Did it have any kind of religious or structured influence? How did you respond to it?
I was raised in a structured environment. We had limited screen time, and no video games until I was in 5th grade, when my brother and I got the wii. We went to church (protestant) because my mother took us, but by the time I was confirmed (8th grade) I didn’t believe in god. I went through with my confirmation because I thought I would get in trouble/judged/ I didn’t want to tell anyone who did believe. Similarily, my mother thought I needed to see a shrink in my senior year of high school and she said I could do a trial appointment and I said fine and then they asked if I wanted 5 more and I didn’t want to say no, but I very much did not want to go. The only real memories I have from that was a complete feeling of anxiety on the way to the office, but nothing from the actual appointment. I became much more independent as a teen, but I maintained my excellent grades. They only ever slipped a little in AP calculus, senior year because it moved too fast/ I stopped seeing a use for it. My favorite subject was government because it defines how we work, and live.
What do you do as a job or as a career (if you have one)? Do you like it? Why or why not?
I have worked on political campaigns in delaware, and now I am interning for the ACLU, and for the democrats communications team at the state house. I enjoy writing speeches and other long form pieces. While I see the reasoning behind social media posts for politicians, it is one of my least favorite things to do because it seems like half the time you’re just saying the same thing over again. Then when I am busy, and doing things that I like. Sometimes I feel undeunused and then I begin to not like it as much. I work better when I have a lot of tasks in a row to do, rather than just one thing.
If you had to spend an entire weekend by yourself, how would you feel? Would you feel lonely or refreshed?
I spend most weekends by myself- though sometimes there are meetings or events that I go to. I use my saturdays to go grocery shopping/run errands, and on sundays I play on my computer. This usually consists of netflix/ other streaming, and sporcle quizzes. I don’t enjoy feeling isolated, though that is a rare feeling. Usually I end my weekends feeling refreshed.
What is your relation with movement and your surroundings? For instance do you prefer a sport or outdoors event? If an outdoors event what is it? And why?
I am not athletic, I do not like team sports or large gatherings. I ride my bike because is free, practical, good for my health, and good for the environment. I sometimes wish that I could go back in time to the 70s in central park where people read or relaxed outside and there were no cell phones (though I also consider the oppression and civil rights work that still needed to be done, so that is a qualified statement) If I do a sport, I enjoy tennis, though I prefer a raquetball style where I just play against a wall. This way, however far I go in terms of volleys made, is solely my responsibility, and every fault that I make is my own. I did run cross country in high school, but that was so that I was well rounded on my college application an cross country didn’t cut. When I have the motivation to begin an exercise routine I feel good afterwards, but usually I don’t begin one. I like to measure everything, so I got an off brand fit bit to track my steps without my phone. I enjoy a gym because all of the equipment is in front of you, and you can just decide what to use. However, most exercise can be done without fancy equipment, so why not just use the outdoors. When left with this decision, usually I will pick the outdoors, but never have the motivation to begin (especially in the winter)
If not what type of activities do you tend to engage in?
I’m usually on my computer or listening to podcast, or deep in some realm or subject. For instance, MBTI typing- is something that I’ve had my heads stuck in for the past week. The last time my head was in it this much was right before I went to college. Other things are tv shows- the past several weeks I have been watching a lot of the newsroom, and delving deep into that fandom. I also have spent a lot of time on sparkle recently because I use it as a learning tool. After the election, I was very interested in PVI (partisan voter index) and its relation to states and how they voted, and what policies the states enacted. i take pride in being a wikipedia of knowledge on certain subjects.
How curious are you? Do you have more ideas then you can execute? What are your curiosities about? What are your ideas about - is it environmental or conceptual, and can you please elaborate?
I like to know things for a reason. If I get very interested in a subject, I will try to explore all the relevant facets of it. or, I will learn something because it is useful in social situations, like a party trick. If I see a problem that I think needs fixing, I will examine how it is dealt with elsewhere and look to find an appropriate solution.
Would you enjoy taking on a leadership position? Do you think you would be good at it? What would your leadership style be?
I don’t like to be the sole leader, because I don’t always think I’m qualified to make the right choice. However, there are certainly less competent people, and I will become aggravated when they are put in charge and are not efficient or hard working. I take many things seriously, and when others do not, I become frustrated with them.
Are you coordinated? Why do you feel as if you are or are not? Do you enjoy working with your hands in some form? Describe your activity?
I do not have great fine motor skills, but I do enjoy certain tactile things. For instance, typing on a MacBook, writing with a good pen, the difference between ink jet and laser printers. I would rather read from a hard source and not a phone, but the phone has more information on it, so I usually choose it over books. my handwriting isn’t great; it’s inconsistent based on several external and internal factors. Colored pens help me focus in school because it helps me remember for tests.
Are you artistic? If yes, describe your art? If you are not particular artistic but can appreciate art please likewise describe what forums of art you enjoy. Please explain your answer.
I am not artistic, but I do appreciate some art. I like abstract art more than realistic art because if I wanted to look at something realistic, I would usually pic a photograph. I enjoy theatre, specifically musical theatre. I appreciate the songs more than the story, because the lyrics and the melody and the orchestrations tell their own, and the music often expresses themes and moods that the lyrics cannot. I appreciate songs with a story or that remind me of a certain time in my life. I also enjoy certain tv shows. I love parks and rec, because it is about government doing good, and I hate the office because they never get anything done and michael scott is incompetent. (I did however watch the whole series just to say i had) I am not a huge fan of friends (it is problematic, and I don’t like it when characters are really dumb) but I did like monica and chandler. My favorite shows are Aaron sorkin shows because they are so well written and they are workplace dramas. I don’t care that other people find them pretentious, I like them. And, most of them have a government based story line. I also like performative art (theatre and tv) because it shows people in love and in relationships, which baffle me. I don’t know how someone can be so open to another person.
What's your opinion about the past, present, and future? How do you deal with them?
The past shows us where we have been and the mistakes we have made. The present shows us how far we have come, and how we have not yet learned. The future will likely be reflective of the past and present because change is so slow.
How do you act when others request your help to do something (anything)? If you would decide to help them, why would you do so?
When people ask for help, I usually comply because I like that they think I am good for something. I don’t help people I don’t know or people who don’t have anything of value to me. the people I help most often are my friends, because i value them and want to see them succeed. I sometimes put off my own tasks to help them if we are studying in the library, either because they really need help or I just don’t want to do my work ( my work always gets done, though)
Do you need logical consistency in your life?
Yes. i don’t like it when things don’t make sense. I don’t like having to justify decisions if they are not wholly aligned with what I believe. When I compromise, it is because I have thought through all the possible options, and that is the best one.
How important is efficiency and productivity to you?
I like to be efficient and productive. If I am not doing something, I am bored or feel useless. I feel most productive when I am checking off tasks from a non existent to-do list. i have no patience for slow walkers or movers because my goal is getting where I need to be, and they are preventing that.
What is your learning style? What kind of learning environments do you struggle with most? Why do you like/struggle with these learning styles? Do you prefer classes involving memorization, logic, creativity, or your physical senses?
I love to learn in a structured environment. I did very well in school; I love the socratic method. I test pretty well, and didn’t really study until high school college. I like classes where there is a point to everything that is learned and classes where everything is connected. I found english classes to be boring, and usually the classes where I tried the least. I do not enjoy group work, I would rather the professor lecture, and ask questions throughout the class. i enjoy classes where the answer can be a single correct answer, but also where you can expand upon, explain, and debate reasons why. I did well in classes with structured learning, but in almost every stage of my education, when given a large assignment (paper, project, etc) I tend to leave it to the last minute, and not do as good of a job as I would have liked to. I want to be proud of these large projects, but instead I pull a couple all nighters and turn it in. usually I score well, but that doesn’t mean I’m proud of my work.
How good are you at strategizing? Do you easily break up projects into manageable tasks? Or do you have a tendency to wing projects and improvise as you go?
When it comes to projects, I know there is a formula as to what goes where, where one should start, how one should go about doing tasks. However, due to my procrastination, I will usually leave things to the last minute and rush through them, but that doesn’t mean I am handing in poor quality work (in the instructor’s eyes,[maybe in mine])
What's important to you and why?
The environment, my independence, and the future of the country. The environment, because everyone depends on it, and it is such an incredible feat of nature that is dying solely due to corporate greed. my independence because I take pride in being self sufficient and not relying on others. the future of the country because politics are of interest to me and the further division of the united states based on political party and geographic region is of great concern. unity in facts and structure and purpose of government are the basis of a healthy democracy. Without that, we are nothing.
What are your fears? What makes you uncomfortable? What do you hate? Why?
I am not really afraid, per say, of anything. I do not like people who are closed minded politically, or those who do things out of pure malice tot people who have individually done nothing wrong. I don’t like it when people refuse to identify a systemic problem as such, and instead try to scapegoat groups or individauals.
Displays of emotion make me increasingly uncomfortable. I have never told anyone that I had “feelings” for them. the only advances in emotional intimacy have been when I was drinking, or doing something just to do it. (ie It’s normal to have gone out on a date by the end of college. I will do it to say that I’ve done it. obviously this was with a random person who asked me out on an app, because I would never jeopardize a real friendship that I had with something as volatile as romantic feelings.) i do not engage in hugs - I find them to be maybe the most intimate physical affection a person can give another. However, the concept of being squeezed tightly without the emotional baggage is something that I open to when I am going out of my mind - spiraling or whatever.
What do the "highs" in your life look like?
When I realize that I have complete control over my life- that I don’t care what other people think about my decisions because I am happy with things just the way they are- even if they are unconventional or weird.
What do the "lows" in your life look like?
Lows happen when i think I am doing something for the right reason - It is the correct next step, it will lead to the next good thing, and then I fail miserably. I either don’t get an opportunity (don’t get a job that I was agilent towards, but saw possibilities in), or I try to engage in a social situation (tried to host a birthday party [even though it was on a day when no one was available] because that’s how you mark your 21st in college) that I don’t fully comprehend. When things don’t work out, I break down in solitude, or if I’m really overwhelmed, in public. i do my best to ignore it if it happens in public until i get to a private location.
Imagine you are alone in a blank, empty room. There is nothing for you to do and no one to talk to. What do you think about?
Whatever is on my mind. My past, problems in the world, how things can be fixed. Or, if I’m really bored, I will recite memorized facts: countries of the world, senators, capitals, etc.
How long do you take to make an important decision? And do you change your mind once you've made it?
If it is very important and I think it may lead to me choosing the seemingly worse option, I will make a list of pros and cons. That allows me to exhaust every option, so I can see the choice for what it really is. I can see the individual effects as well as any broader effects.
How long do you take to process your emotions? How important are emotions in your life?
Usually I will make a decision to like someone (romantically) because I have measured their traits, and I have specific reasons why this is a good choice. In the past, I have made the decision to stop liking someone because of external circumstances. I followed through on that, but in the end reversed, because if I was going to have a potential with someone, that would be the person. I try to rationalize everything, because that’s the smart thing to do. Then you have a reason for everything that you can defend. I am not good at picking up on romantic cues from others. This leads me to question my acceptability as a potential long or short term mate. However, if I was missing cues, I would not have accurate information.
Do you ever catch yourself agreeing with others just to appease them and keep the conversation going? How often? Why?
If I don’t have anything else to add to a conversation, I will usually stop talking and the conversation, whether in person or online, will cease to include me. I don’t mind just listening, though. If I’m actively trying to keep the conversation going, because of a person or goal, I will sometimes do this, but if it is done too often, I feel fake and I don’t know why I’m doing something.
Do you break rules often? Do you think authority should be challenged, or that they know better? If you do break rules, why would you?
I understand the purpose behind rules as a general principle. When examining each rule, I can usually understand the purpose behind each rule. Usually I decide to follow the rule. If that is the case, I follow it to a T. However, if I find the rule to serve no purpose, an arbitrary purpose, or a bad purpose, and that outweighs the reasoning for the rule to exist as a rule, I will decide not to follow it.
What is the ideal life, in your opinion?
I want to work for what I believe in to change the way people think about government. I want to understand why people identify as one ideology over another, and how that intersects with their class, geography, race/ethnicity, gender, and background. I want t be able to get everywhere on public transportation, I want to live a life that depends on external factors as little as possible, and I want to create as little waste as possible. I would not like children, and I don’t know about a long term partner. Those things usually don’t work out for me because I never say how I really feel at risk of losing a friendship that I have or being judged by that person or my peers.
I’m writing this part last, as for the reader to remain unbiased from previous results. I have taken almost every kind of test, and gotten ISTJ, INTP, and INTJ. The first time I took it (between high school and college) I got INTJ. Most recently, I have been getting ISTJ. I had my friend take it for me, in hopes of eliminating bias and He gave me ISTJ. I also don’t trust any of the tests because I have an understanding of both the cognitive function arm as well as th simple letter form, and can identify for the most part what question corresponds to what trait. Also, many of the tests are set up on a scale- from strongly agree to strongly disagree, but each statement has different variables that could be adjusted. Furthermore, many questions are compound questions, which lead me to reject the premise of a question, or part of it, but still have to answer. To that point, I also am hesitant to select the furthest option on a 5 item scale because that implies an absolute, which is/should be a rare occurrence. This selection has the potential to affect my results.
Additionally, I have certain biases that I acknowledge (I don’t like feelings, and I am torn between S and N functions because while I like facts, I also know that not considering the bigger picture and interconnectedness of topics leads to things like systemic failure being overlooked.) Additionally, there is the concept that that I’m toying with wherein you could have functions stacked in an order which would give you an I or an E, independent of the concept of introversion versus extroversion. Along these lines, I think the functions that I most use are the ones from ISTJ, but I do think that my Ne is higher than an inferior function, and the only other possibilities for those functions are extroverted or feeling, which from a preliminary analysis, I have eliminated from consideration.
today, I took Keys 2 Congnition, and recieved ISTJ, with some caveats:
Se 15.8
Si 35.1
Ne 39.0
Ne 17.8
Te 47.3
Ti 34.9
Fe 10.6
Fi 39.9
Some inconsistencies/dichotomies from scores that I have observed in my own behavior include/ additional things I have noticed:
I have a messy external state (messy room, physical surroundings) but I feel best when I am in a routine and know what’s next.
I like having structure, but filling the structure differently sometimes.
I really like rules, and see the purpose behind them- and when I do, I will follow them to a T, much to the annoyance of my peers, but when I think they are not just, I will violate them without hesitation.
I am a huge procrastinator, but there is hardly ever an instance where I did not do what I said I would do.
If I don’t think an argument is strong enough to make a decision, I won’t - I like to leave my options open. This is why I don’t like chess. I don’t know what the other person will do, so don’t make the smartest moves.
I appreciate the practical applications of math - but I stopped liking it when it became too abstract for my purposes (ie calculus). However, abstract theories about political science, the law, history, are all things that interest me greatly, sometimes more than the practical nature.
I don’t like maxims because they usually make a statement untrue.
In social situations, I've noticed that friend think I'm funny/weird. I don't think they are being mean, but in the difference between laughing with and laughing at, they usually land on the laughing at side.
Sometimes, when I'm really stressed out or just want to be alone in a very social setting, I will go into a small space for a while. Alternatively, if I'm very anxious, I will release on my bicycle, going as quickly as I can to get away from my problems.

Please let me know if you have any questions.
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2018.12.09 06:03 Footsteps_10 A novice attempting to learn.

Hello Everyone,
I am a family man, 28 with two young boys. I live in Chicago and recently graduated with my MBA from an average business school. I am a Claims Adjuster and use to be a college soccer coach for the early part of my career. The part about the MBA, I got through business school, but I don’t have much a background in finance, if any.
I have grown to love to this community over the past year. My shares of Aphria are about to go long and I have invested in no other company in this sector. I did all my research that I could on the company and I am a big believer in “concentration builds wealth, diversification protects it”. Their EPS made sense and I felt that the Canadian market was simply too small with 35 million people, so I enjoyed the Liberty connection in Florida.
I bought nearly one month prior to the NUU acquisition with 40-60 shares and I laughed at my first foray into non-blue chips became a disaster. Warren Buffett continually sang to me, that I should never have bought the company in the first place if I intended to sell. I still don’t, and I was buying on Thursday.
Which brings me to my point of this entire reflection, I do not understand this market at all. The main goal seems to be to advertise the cannabis business, so tobacco and spirits can move in. I understand the benefits of impressive levels of capital and knowledge this kind of relationship can offer. Additionally, I understand the tobacco and alcohol sector with consolidation.
However, America is the honeypot. No Canadian LP can move in without finding a back channel. There seems to be a much larger game at play with Aphria and I cannot pull back the veil to “see the whole board”, if I can quote Aaron Sorkin from The West Wing.
If I could ask a few clarify questions to form further resolve on my investment.
  1. Liberty is Aphria, why do we not evaluate Aphria in a holistic approach including Liberty’s footprint into Florida and other states?
  2. Aphria has partnerships with Southern Glazers for sales benefits, so why does Aphria need an equity stake to compete long term?
Meaning, if they have a contract to provide top of the line sales benefits with shelf space and distribution, what does equity and partnerships offer them beyond outside expertise?
  1. Will Scythian/SOL come under one banner with LHS and Aphria?
This seems like a logical step for business associates that all know each other, recent events aside and I mean that truly. Again, I am not at the level of detail that some of my community members, but most executives between the three companies have all worked together in some capacity correct?
  1. If Aphria starts to dominate 2019 with strong financials, why can’t they continue/dominate without a partner?
Cash should not be an issue and their product offering should only be bolstered with recreational maturing in 2019. Simply, what will $MO do for Cronos that Aphria can’t do for themselves?
  1. Lastly. what is this fourth company that I keep hearing connected to Aphria?
EDIT - It's Schottenstein. What is this company?
" Aphria co-founder Cole Cacciavillani said in an interview this week the company — if granted a license in Ohio — would operate under the newly formed business Liberty Health Science, which went live today on the Canadian Stock Exchange."
I mean these kinds of quotes I just find fascinating.
Thank you to all and to your 19-year-old gambling age in Windsor. Lost my first gambling money there growing up in college. I have no intentions to sell and I see no reason to.
Amazon one day sold books then ran the world. Explain that one to me. Things can change quick.
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2018.11.22 03:55 DifficultFuel Thoughts on Sorkin's To Kill a Mockingbird Preview

I’m a child of the deep south, a lover of TKAMB and a lifelong Aaron Sorkin fan - basically the target audience. I was really worried about this project; I honestly couldn’t imagine what it would be like. This week, I saw the 11/19 preview. The play was imaginative, moving - wonderful, really. I cried; my wife cried.
And I have thoughts, because it filled me with such a sense of ALMOST. It is probable that you are not interested in my thoughts, especially since they are not really a review and only make sense if you’ve actually seen the show :) But here they are, anyway. First, the through-line of an Atticus with a blinding faith in humanity which is tested, then broken, then hardened, seems right to me, and current. To me, it does create a reason to tell this story now. I would argue it’s faithful, too. It makes the play alive in a way that I wasn’t expecting. So, kudos.
But there are also three main points that I think are broken which could make the play really land.
First, easiest: there are too many “Sorkinisms” sprinkled throughout. Mostly, there are several “I will state my philosophy” lines that need to go. Several are Ewell’s. One example: Ewell’s “revolution” quote at the end of the lamp standoff. Too much telling not showing. I understand building the character up, but he becomes a little too self-aware in this piece, he’s almost Brechtian and it breaks the story a bit. REL Ewell’s eloquence (if you can call it that) has always been in his cruelty. Similar Atticus’s counterpoints - “You will always be inferior.” Declarative statements are, in general, the weakest part of Sorkin's dialogue and ripe for trimming.
Second, Calpurnia. This one’s harder, and there are subsections. Okay - I understand what’s at play here. TKAMB is really about white goodness and centers a white moral standoff about blackness in ways that are problematic. So, building up Calpurnia makes sense as dramaturgy.
Subsection One is that Calpurnia, right now, plays a little like a ghost/imaginary friend - she only seems to have conversations with Atticus one on one. It seems like via staging she could be more integrated into the life of the family, even through background movement (which the play does a lot). The chasing game with the kids when she’s introduced is her only real moment of intimacy with them, which is strange. What’s the initial foundation of the intimacy with Atticus that we’re told about if not her relationship with the children coupled with his loneliness (and of course her own uniqueness)? We need to see that broken-quasi-family work - which I think you could do in a very few minutes of stage time.
Subsection Two, the Atticus/Calpurnia scenes themselves. I understand (I think) that Sorkin is trying to write against the trope about him which is that the liberal white guy always wins the argument. I see how she turns around his famous “crawl inside their skin” quote and counters his humanism in ways that turn out to be prescient. But two things make her side weaker. First, she doesn’t have a lived experience outside of their family except when she sits in the audience at the trial. Can she ever have a connection point to the black community? Something that is just hers that she brings into the arguments? Right now, she seems more like a wall knocking back Atticus’s opinions than a character. What’s her throughline?
Subsection Three, for me, is a performance issue. Daniels brings a lot of still focus to the role, which I loved. But neither he nor the actress playing Calpurnia seemed that different around each other. I didn’t see the sibling thing. She had a lot of wasted motion and some mannerisms that seemed too modern for the period - I felt like I needed more focus from her (she can be honest with him about her intensity) and less from him (she’s in his home and he can kind of drop the act a bit). They weren’t great scene partners and those scenes need to be the heart of the play in this telling, I think.
The final issue builds on the first two: the ending - which is, I would argue, maybe too faithful and so lacks the currency of earlier sequences. So, we have a Calpurnia who vocalizes criticism of the police shooting Tom. Makes sense. In my hometown, anyway, she would have known the Robinson’s family. She would have a whole network of relationships outside the Finch’s (best part about Go Set a Watchman was her family, btw). That would likely make the tragedy of Tom incredibly relevant to her – it would be like her own family dying.
So, two weeks later, when the same Sheriff that failed to protect Tom opts to protect a white man that actually committed murder? I think her feelings would be more complicated. Tom’s tragedy would still be present, the loss to his family too fresh, for her to get by with a simple “Morning’s taking it’s time”. The ending would be much more powerful if you could acknowledge the issue with discriminatory justice that’s at play. In the novel, the ending restores some of Atticus’s faith in humanity, right? But that’s sort of a blinder, we know, because that faith is coded by race. The play is trying hard to overcome the novel’s blind eye on this issue. But it falls apart on this job a little at the end. By bringing the loss of Tom back into the narrative to complicate the triumph of the children surviving (maybe via Calpurnia), I think you could land Atticus’s arc better.
In the end, why would this new Atticus push for more black folks to sit on juries? Because he finally understands that even Arthur Radley, town bogeyman, gets a better shake from the law than Tom Robinson did. That makes the arc much weightier than the current finale.
Thanks for listening. I feel passionately about this or I wouldn’t have stayed up ranting. I love the work overall, I’m grateful for it, and I'm thrilled I got to see it.
-Mitch


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2018.07.29 00:53 namkcuR Ranking Characters: 11+ Episode Recurring

Alright, I recently posted my Ranking Characters: 5-10 Episode Recurring, and my Ranking Characters: The One-Offs and Ranking Characters: 2-4 Episode Recurring before that. Without further ado, here is my ranking of the 11+ Episode Recurring characters, creme-de-la-creme of WW recurring characters.
(Please keep in mind that this will not include what I call "non-Regular regular" characters like Margaret, Ed & Larry, other assistants, press corp reporters, etc. There will be a separate list for them. I just felt they aren't the same thing as what I'm ranking here.)
20. Bram Howard, portrayed by Matthew Del Negro // 16 Episodes, Seasons 6-7
Despite appearing in a fair number of episodes in the final two seasons, Bram, a Santos staffer, didn't seem to have much of an impact, and not a whole lot of personality either. He was just kind of 'there'. Maybe I'm forgetting things, but in my recollection, he's the least memorable of all the characters on this list, by a wide margin. Sorry, Bram.
19. Secretary Of Defense Miles Hutchinson, portrayed by Steve Ryan // 16 Episodes, Seasons 4-7
Steve Ryan, who has sadly passed in the years since the show ended, really gave Hutchinson a highly memorable presence. Hutchinson was a bit of an asshole, and often tended to get into arguments with the White House over 'turf'. You rarely ever saw anyone get in Leo's face the way Hutchinson did in "Inauguration: Over There". It's probably a realistic depiction of how cabinet secretaries can behave sometimes, though, and Ryan sold it well, going right up to the edge without going over the top.
18. Helen Santos, portrayed by Teri Polo // 18 Episodes, Seasons 6-7
Helen is a character that I recall being pretty unpopular amongst fans. I can understand why. She often complained, and came off as someone who really wished her husband wasn't running for president and was being dragged into the whole thing under duress. As a result, she often seemed cold and unsupportive.
On the other hand, as a mother, it's the natural thing to want put your kids above anything and everything, and as a wife, it's understandable to be a bit bent out of shape if your husband is doing this big thing in spite of the fact that you didn't want it.
Nevertheless, there are moments of genuine support and love mixed in, and by the time Santos is sworn in, she seemed to be warming up to everything a little.
She may not have been super likable, but she was probably more realistic than we'd like to think.
17. Vice President Robert "(Bingo) Bob" Russell, portrayed by Gary Cole // 22 Episodes, Seasons 5-7
Ok, Russell being this low is not meant as a big insult. It's just that on this list, practically every character after this is a classic character, and I couldn't talk myself into putting any of them below Bingo Bob.
The character was introduced early in season 5, one of the first big things the Wells regime did after wrapping up the kidnapping storyline, and you can tell the sole purpose of the character from the minute he was introduced was to be the Democratic frontrunner that the eventual "chosen one"(ended up being Santos) would defeat as the underdog. In this respect, the character was such a plot point that he was rarely able to just breathe as a character(and in fact, was barely seen after losing the primary).
That said, I give a lot of credit to Gary Cole, because I think he took what could've been a Robert-Ritchie-esque character on paper and did a lot more with it than some other actors could've. He did a good job portraying an ambitious man, even if it was empty ambition, who was smarter than people gave him credit for, who knew what people thought of him, and who was determined to prove people wrong. He took what could've been a bad character and made him a pretty decent one.
He's only this low because the rest of the characters on the list are more than decent, imo.
16. Ronna, portrayed by Karis Campbell // 22 Episodes, Seasons 6-7
I love Ronna. Ronna was longtime congressional staffer for Santos who joined the campaign with him, and was there until the end, at which point she was given a job in the White House, presumably as the new Mrs. Landingham, aka Executive Secretary outside the Oval Office.
She always just seemed like such a nice, warm person, who was in the business for all the right reasons, not a careerist, but someone who really wanted to affect change and help people.
There is a scene in the very last episode, when she sees the Oval Office in person for the first-time, and she gets all wide-eyed and happy, like a kid seeing all the presents under the tree on Christmas morning, yet simultaneously like an adult that is humbled and honored to be a part of something bigger than herself. She is moved by that moment. I've always felt like in that moment, she embodied all the highest ideals that were present in all of the main characters in the Bartlet administration, and that the show had set out to embody from the beginning.
If the show had gone on with the Santos administration, Ronna definitely should've made the main cast.
15. Louise Thornton, portrayed by Janeane Garofalo // 15 Episodes, Season 7
It always felt like Louise was written with Garofalo in mind, though that's probably not the case. You just can't imagine anyone else playing her.
Thornton was this highly intelligent, aggressive, fearless, successful, sardonic, prickly communications advisor on the Santos general election campaign. She knew her shit, she knew how the game was played, and she wasn't afraid to tell Josh if/when she thought he was wrong about something(that's probably why Josh initially didn't even want her at that first meeting).
But she was also a mercenary type, not too eager to swear loyalty to one person or one administration. You get the feeling she didn't want to drink anyone's kool-aid and then end up disappointed.
Nonetheless, Josh convinced her to become the Communications Director for the Santos administration, which absolutely seemed like the right and natural role for her.
Over the years, when people talk about what the ideal cast would've been for an eight(ninth, etc) season, Garofalo/Thornton is always near the top of the list, the new Toby, etc. I can't help but agree with that.
She was a great character that would be a valuable voice and asset in any number of political situations going forward, and I've always liked Garofalo, a unique and under-appreciated talent.
14. Mallory O'Brien, portrayed by Allison Smith // 11 Episodes, Seasons 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7
The only daughter of Leo McGarry, she was a fixture in the Sorkin years, particularly the first season, and was seen sporadically throughout the show's run(maybe the only character outside the main cast who was in both the pilot and "Tomorrow"?) mainly as a potential romantic partner for Sam.
I always liked Mallory, she was passionate, smart, would tell you exactly what she thought of you, and could throw elbows with the WH senior staff.
Of all of Sam's potential love interests - Lauri, Mallory, Ainsley, etc - I think Mallory was the best match(though he and Ainsley had the most physical chemistry). They were both intellects, both fiercely liberal(Mallory maybe even more than Sam), both felt duty to things bigger than themselves(Sam to government, Mallory to education), and so on. When they were on screen together, they would often argue, but in the way that people who like to argue with each other argue, and at the end of the day, there always seemed to be genuine affection between them.
It's a shame she was kind of dropped after taking Sam home in 20 Hours In America.
13. Deborah Fiderer, portrayed by Lily Tomlin // 35 Episodes, Seasons 3-7
Tomlin is a national treasure, a totally unique persona, and there is obviously so much of her in Deborah, that it's another instance where no one else could have played her.
Mrs. Landingham was a beloved character, and it probably would've been a bad decision to try to make her replacement anything like her, so it's a good thing they made Deborah the absolute polar opposite.
The hippie-dippy personality, the quirkiness, the eccentricity, and more animated sense of humor all set her apart of Mrs. Landingham's more direct approach and deadpan sense of humor.
That very same humor and eccentricity could've made her seem not up to the job - in fact it did for Bartlett at first - but everybody soon found that underneath all of that was a very smart, classy, uber-competent woman who would kick ass at the job, and whom Bartlett and his staff would grow very fond of.
It's not easy to step into the shoes left by a character beloved by those both inside and outside the show, but Tomlin/Fiderer were quite up to the task, and the result was highly memorable character in her own right.
12. Congresswoman Andrea 'Andy' Wyatt, portrayed by Kathleen "Bird" York // 15 Episodes, Seasons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7
Andy was important in that her presence added depth to an already deep and much-loved main character in Toby.
The interactions between the two of them served to show that Toby, while a good man, was a difficult man to deal with between his temperament and his dedication to his work, and that he may just not have been ideal husband(or even boyfriend) material.
The scene in the house when Toby proposes and Andy says no, because he's too sad, and he'll always be sad, is one of the more heartbreaking scenes in the whole series because it's true, and all of Toby's history shows it, but it took seeing it from Andy's point of view to really crystalize that aspect of Toby's personality.
In her own right, Andy was always shown as a highly intelligent, powerful woman - she was a congresswoman after all - with her own political views that didn't always line up with the White House, a woman could stand up to to any man, but also a sensitive women who felt things deeply beneath her hardened surface. She also had a great sense of humor.
It was a really good depiction of a career woman who was also a borderline single mom to twins, who was somehow balancing it all. A woman to be reckoned with.
11. Agent Ron Butterfield, portrayed by Michael O'Neil // 16 Episodes, Seasons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7
It never seemed like Michael O'Neil was acting. He just was Ron. O'Neil is very adept at this sort of serious-government-official type role, as he's done it in multiple other shows(most recently on Scandal), but he was never better than here. You can't imagine anyone taking that particular job more seriously or being more dedicated to it than Ron was. His job was to protect the President, and that's what he did, to 1000% of his abilities.
Any time there was any of security-related crisis, Ron was there, always to kindly tell everyone there's nothing to worry about, or to make darn clear shit is going down.
His shining moment has to be "In The Shadow Of Two Gunmen", first screaming at the driver "GW! GW!", and then his conversation with Toby, culminating in perhaps his most memorable piece of dialogue:
"It wasn't your fault. It wasn't Gina's fault, it wasn't Charlie's fault, it wasn't anybody's fault, Toby. It was an act of madmen. You think a tent was going to stop them? We got the President in the car. We got Zoey in the car. And at 150 yards, five stories up, the shooters were down 9.2 seconds after the first shot was fired. I would never let you not let me protect the President. You tell us you don't like something, we figure out something else. It was an act of madmen. Anyway, the Secret Service doesn't comment on procedure."
Ron's entire character is embodied in that paragraph of dialogue. He was a great character. One of the hallmarks of an actor nailing a character is that you have trouble seeing that actor in any other role. I've seen O'Neil in 24, Scandal, even as a mass shooter in Grey's Anatomy, but every time, I see him and all I can think is, 'that's Ron Butterfield'. That probably won't change.
10. White House Associate Counsel Ainsley Hayes, portrayed by Emily Proctor // 12 Episodes, Seasons 2, 3, 7
One of the criticisms during the first season of the show was that it was too liberal, that it wasn't presenting conservative viewpoints fairly. I guess when WW started, Aaron Sorkin wasn't as well-known as he is now. Now, nobody would expecting anything other than unabashed, unapologetic liberalism from him, but back then, he was just the showrunner, and the show was seen as too liberal, and that was that.
So early in season 2, the character of Ainsley Hayes was introduced, a conservative lawyer hired, ultimately by Bartlet himself, to be an Associate Counsel, because Bartlet likes smart people who disagree with him.
Here's the thing about this character: As well-written as she is, given the nature of the character and her political views, her likability factor, and chemistry with the rest of the cast, was going to be very dependent on the actress and the portrayal. Fortunately, Emily Proctor absolutely nailed it.
She brought the character to life as this warm, sensitive, sweet, hyper-intelligent young woman, every bit as idealistic and duty-bound and humbled by the job and the building as Bartlett's staff, only a Republican. She delivered pro-gun, anti-EPA, and other conservative arguments in a sympathetic manner(not saying I was convinced by any of them, I'm no Republican after all). And she was gorgeous. Three cheers for Emily Proctor.
The way she was introduced was ingenious as well. The first time we see her is with her obnoxious friends, who exhibit unfiltered hatred towards Democrats. When she sees them again after her first White House visit, one of them asks, 'did you meet anyone there who wasn't worthless?'. Showing the contrast between them and Ainsley was great. It was as if Sorkin was saying "That's how you think we talk about Republicans, but it's not. Instead, here's our fair take on a Republican."
And that's ultimately the triumph of Ainsley Hayes, that she's depiction of a good person you'd have no problem calling a friend, who happens to have different political opinions. Sorkin would take a different tact when he created the Robert Ritchie character, a caricature of a Republican, but here, he created a genuinely lovable conservative who felt like a real, genuine person, and Emily Proctor gave her life flawlessly. The proof is that you always hear people bemoaning that CSI: Miami happened, and wishing she would've stuck around longer. It's entirely possible these 12 episodes were the best work of her career.
Oh yeah, and she had off-the-charts physical chemistry with Sam. When you take two people who would have chemistry with a chair, and put them together, that tends to happen.
9. Mrs. Delores Landingham, portrayed by Kathryn Joosten // 30 Episodes, Seasons 1-4(flashbacks in 3 and 4)
Kathryn Joosten didn't start acting until she was in her 40s, and her most well-known roles - this and Karen McCluskey on Desperate Housewives - didn't come until she was in her 60s. It was an unusual career arc, but perhaps having led a normal life for 40 years before she started acting is part of why Mrs. Landingham felt like such an authentic, lived-in character.
There was a humbleness to Mrs. Landingham, she had no ego on her. She was there to her job, to serve her country, and her friend of decades, Jed. She took no shortcuts, as illustrated when she refused to take any discount on new car in 18th and Potomac. This humbleness and sense of duty is all the more remarkable once you hear her tell Josh that both of her sons died in Vietnam. Joosten's performance in that scene is something else. It's subtle, but she does such a good job of conveying, just in her face, that grief that never goes away.
Because of her long relationship with Bartlet, she seemed to be the only person other than Abby and Leo to have 'I can say whatever I want' privileges with him. She took much advantage of this, never missing an opportunity to tell the leader of the free world how things were, or mock him, or challenge him. It was a unique relationship they had, and you could tell they both treasured it.
It is her combination of humility, spunk, wit, and heart that makes her such a beloved character. And she meant a lot to Bartlet and his staff. The staff takes is hard, but Bartlet is so distraught he is moved to curse at God in Latin.
She mattered, and her death mattered too. To quote Leo, "She was a real dame. A real broad."
8. Zoey Bartlet, portrayed by Elisabeth Moss // 25 Episodes, Seasons 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7
I said on the last list that Ellie was my favorite Bartlet sister, but it's not too difficult to see why they decided to give Zoey the most airtime. If you had these three options in front of you:
Eldest sister, more or less a soccer mom by choice in a less-than-ideal marriage.
Middle sister, shy post-grad bookworm who doesn't like attention
or
Youngest sister, single free-spirit college girl looking to enjoy the experience and have fun
You might see where Zoey was the best option for the stories they were looking to tell, because they were looking to build significant plots around her.
Most of Zoey's screen time is in her storyline with Charlie(and Gina) leading up to the assassination attempt, and then in the lead-up to the kidnapping and its aftermath. She pops up a few times outside of that(and gets back together with Charlie by the end), but most of her time was in major plots, and she was the sister that worked best in that role.
And the character works well, largely in part because of Elisabeth Moss's portrayal. Moss has gone on to become one of the Prestige TV era's most successful actresses - from The West Wing to Mad Men to Top Of The Lake to Handmaiden's Tale, she seems to have a Midas touch - and her success is well-deserved. She gives Zoey a warmth, a vivaciousness, a free-spiritedness, a zest for life that makes her appealing. This is especially apparent in the first season, and I feel like we can gradually see her losing her innocence as the seasons go on. I think that's both good writing and good acting. Moss is really probably the reason Zoey is ranked this high.
Zoey and Charlie are a very popular couple, I think rightly so. I dig them. I like the notion that they can overcome both the racial barrier and the socioeconomic barrier(she's a president's daughter, he comes from nothing) to find love together. It's always been slightly mystifying that she'd go from Charlie to Jean-Paul, but then again, she explains that in her and Charlie's conversation in Evidence Of Things Not Seen, and I think it's my favorite dialogue she ever had:
ZOEY It's been four years in the White House, another being the daughter of a candidate. Eight years as Governor. My grades get printed in the paper. My boyfriends are in the paper. I live and die by my parents' successes and failures. And so do you. Sometimes even more than me. And Jean-Paul doesn't. He's happy. He's... just... happy.
CHARLIE That's cause he's got five hundred million dollars and no conscience.
ZOEY No it isn't. He cares about things. And one of them is me. And none of them are this, and that's appealing to me right now.
Clearly, she misjudged Jean Paul, but I think this dialogue gives the clearest window into her character and her psyche that we ever got. And it's understandable, the desire to just escape from that world for a while.
Zoey is an interesting, appealing(most of the time) character who was a focal point of some of the show's most famous plots, and she put Elisabeth Moss on the map, so she'll always be one of the show's most remembered recurring characters.
7. Joey Lucas, portrayed by Marlee Matlin / 17 Episodes, Seasons 1-7
I'm a huge admirer of Marlee Matlin. I imagine she must be such an inspiration to deaf people who want to act or be in the performing arts. But it's not just that she's made it as an actress in a hearing world, it's that she's a great actress.
Because she can't rely too much on speech, she has to do a lot of acting with her face and her body, and she has mastered that art. She is capable of showing so much on her face, from amusement to frustration to worry to confusion to happiness, on and on. She conveys a whole world of emotions just with her facial expressions, and it's great to watch.
The character of Joey has one of the great introductory scenes, waking up and yelling, via her interpreter, at hungover, unshaven, and disoriented Josh in his office. It's a really effective illustration, right off that bat, of a woman who doesn't see her deafness as any kind of a handicap, and has no problem yelling at people and doing what needs to be done to do her job well.
Joey is always impeccably good at her job, always giving Bartlet and his staff exactly the numbers they need, using utmost discretion when necessary(as when she did the poll prior to the MS announcement), as well as sometimes giving them numbers they don't even know they need(as in 20 Hours In LA when she reminds Toby and Sam that Al Kiefer forgot to ask how much people CARE about the flag burning issue, leading Josh to remark 'You have any idea how big you scored with Toby and Sam right now?', to which Joey confidently responds 'Yes'). She also, oftentimes, offers sage political advice to go along with the numbers. She's a big mind, and she becomes indispensable to the administration.
More than that, she's just a good person. I thought it spoke volumes when she asked Josh, "how's the president?" in the airport after he finished telling her about the MS and explaining what he needed from her. He's just laid this huge bombshell on her, and tasked her with a difficult task, and the first thing she does is ask how the president is. That's the kind of person she was, to have the poise to be able to ask that question at that moment, and the heart to want to. She has a beautiful soul.
I love Joey. (For the record, I wouldn't have minded her with Josh, but I feel like he wouldn't have had the patience to be in a relationship with a deaf woman, and she wouldn't have had the patience to put him his intense personality.)
Shout out to the guy who played her interpreter, Kenny. He probably doesn't get enough love, but he should. He's a big part of the character.
6. Danny Concanon, portrayed by Timothy Busfield // 28 Episodes, Seasons 1, 2, 4, 5, 7
Busfield has been one of the most likable actors in television for decades, ever since he portrayed Elliot in Thirtysomething, and he brings that quality, that effortless likability and intangible decency, to Danny Concanon in full force. He really fit into Sorkin's universe perfectly.
I suppose it was decided early on that they needed a reporter character, and thus Danny was created. It would've been easy for such a character to end up being cold, or stand-offish, or careerist, but Danny was affable, approachable, and he turned down a promotion because he loved being a reporter. That he managed to be all of this while also being as relentless as any other reporter who wants a story and better at the job than most of the others is just icing on the cake.
It's fun watching him screw with the staff for fun - obviously with Josh in "Celestial Navigation", goading him into saying they had a secret inflation plan, and again in "The Portland Trip", when he has fun with CJ by not giving back the draft Sam choked on, as retribution for her having made of Notre Dame.
It's also fun watching him go after a story like a dog with a bone, as with the Shareef story in season 4. He just keeps digging and digging until he gets there, and even though he's a total pain in CJ's ass, she, and everyone else, respects his game and his chops.
He is also shown to be a man with a moral code. Like any reporter, he steadfastly refuses to ever divulge a source. When Leo tells him lives are at stake, he delays a story. And when CJ is almost about to leak him a story that she was told to keep a lid, he doesn't let her, saying that in twenty minutes she wouldn't like him anymore(yes, he admits he took free leads from previous secretaries, but this shows that when there's a personal relationship at stake, he'll protect the person). Also, in "Inauguration: Over There", when his editor screws him, he rushes to tell CJ that it wasn't him, that he wouldn't do that.
If there's any weakness to the character, it's that he disappeared for long stretches. He was in the first season and the first third of the second season, and then he disappeared completely for a while. I've always thought it was a real shame that he wasn't around during the MS storyline, I thought he could've had a big role there. He returned midway through season 4, and was around for the remainder of the season for the Shareef storyline, and then after the season 5 premiere, he disappeared again for two years. Finally, he returned again for a third stint in season 7 to give CJ her happy ending.
Regarding his and CJ's relationship, I think they're a great match intellectually, morally, in terms of worldview. It also helps that he appeared to comfortable enough in his own skin to be Mr. CJ Gregg. A woman of her stature sometimes struggles to find a man who can play that role. It certainly took a while for CJ to finally let her guard down and let Danny in, but hopefully it was the beginning of a long and successful relationship.
Danny bordered on being a plot device at times, particularly in his second two stints, but ultimately he's a strong enough character played by a strong enough actor that it didn't matter.
5. Amelia 'Amy' Gardner, portrayed by Mary Louise Parker // 23 Episodes, Seasons 3-7
So we come to perhaps the series' most polarizing character. Some love her, some can't stand her, but almost everyone has a strong opinion about Amy Gardner.
If you love her, you might say it's because she is exceptionally head-strong, singularly passionate for her cause, super competent, relentless and talented at her job, willing to call the guys out on their crap, and funny. Oh, and because she had great physical chemistry with Josh.
If you can't stand her, you might say it's because she, at times, perpetuates the image of feminists as being crazy or unreasonable(I saw somebody write a whole article on that), or because she comes off as unstable sometimes(ok, one time in particular), or because she's too much of a smart-ass, or because she has a high opinion of herself and does't seem to work well in a group setting, or because of a general immaturity where she seems to be more comfortable when fighting with someone than when not.
There's that famous scene in "We Killed Yamamoto" where she throws Josh's cell phone into the boiling pot of stew and then literally cuts the cord on the landline with scissors. That was simultaneously a low point for the character and one of her most memorable moments. Every time I watch it, I feel like yelling 'Run Josh, run, she's crazy man, get out of there!'.
It is a testament to the overall strength and memorability of the character that she ranks this high despite coming of as cuckoo sometimes. Regardless of where you stand with her, she is clearly one of the most memorable recurring characters the show ever had.
As far as her and Josh go...I know there are people to this day who think they should've been endgame instead of Josh and Donna, but I'm a Jonna guy, so I disagree. For me, it's as simple as this: Josh and Amy are too much alike. They're both political soldiers, they are both super intense when it comes to their work, and they both will never give up a fight. I think they would've eventually driven each other crazy(in fact that's kind of what happened, isn't it?). Josh didn't need someone who would just match, and exacerbate, his most troublesome traits(as far as his long-term mental and emotional health are concerned), but rather someone who would calm him down, pull him away from the fight, and show him that there's more to life than said fight. That's Donna. That's my position and Josh/Amy shippers can yell at me for it if they wish.
No matter how you slice it, any character that generates such passions, negative or positive, among fans, should probably be high on a list like this. For what it's worth, my favorite Amy episodes are in seasons 4-5 when she's Abby's chief of staff.
4. Bruno Gianelli, portrayed by Ron Silver // 19 Episodes, Seasons 3, 4, 6, 7
Bruno was a complex character, one who carried himself like shark, willing to do whatever it takes to win and get paid, and yet one who also has strong beliefs of his own.
He is clearly shown as being no qualms about bending the rules to beat the enemy because 'I don't know how else to fight fire with fire'(I'm thinking specifically of changing a few words to turn a candidate ad into an issue ad). He and his people often got into heated debates with Bartlet's staff on that because Bartlet's staff always wanted to stand on principle and do the right thing, where Bruno would always yell at them that you have to win first. He was a pragmatist in that way.
Some would point to his famous dialogue from "Gone Quiet":
"Because I am tired of working for candidates who make me think I should be embarrassed to believe what I believe, Sam. I'm tired of getting them elected. We all need some therapy, because someone came along and said that liberal means "soft on crime." Soft on drugs. Soft on communism. Soft on defense. And we're gonna tax you back to the stone age because people shouldn't have to go to work if they don't want to. And instead of saying, 'Well, excuse me, you right-wing, reactionary xenophobic, homophobic, anti-education, anti-choice, pro-gun, Leave-it-to-Beaver-trip-back-to-the-fifties!' we cowered in the corner and said, 'Please. Don't. Hurt. Me.' No more. I really don't care who's right, who's wrong. We're both right, we're both wrong".
And say that it illustrates a liberal ideology. But you could probably argue that his real point with those words was to say that the right wing was painting that extreme picture of the left, that he was against politics becoming such a battle of extremes, but that if forced to, he'd play that game to win.
This would make his decision to work for Vinnick later on make more sense(though it was probably really because Ron Silver switched sides for real), in that Vinnick was a moderate, and Bruno would work for anyone that would move politics as a whole to the center(and pay well).
Because Bruno was ultimately a centrist and a pragmatist who didn't have much use for extreme ideology.
It's a type of character not seen much in the WW universe.
Beyond this, Bruno was also great because he was multi-faceted. He could be blunt and brutal and insulting, often in a funny way, when trying to get people to just focus on winning. As in "Manchester" when everyone is in the shed, arguing, and Bruno finally says:
"Yeah. Uh, listen up. I've been thinking it might not be such a bad idea to lock you all in here and set the place on fire. We have 48 hours before we kick off this campaign. We will work hard. We will work well. We will work together. Or so help me, mother of God, I will stick a pitchfork so far up your asses, you will, quite simply, be dead."
But then on the other hand, there are moments when you see some sensitivity, and when you see him actually be moved by something, like after Bartlet gives the speech in "College Kids", and Bruno's talking to Josh, and he says:
"The speech to the teachers this morning? 24 years in professional politics, I have never seen anything like it. You would have been proud. We're going to win this election, you know?"
or even in "20 Hours In America" when Bartlet gives the "streets are too crowded with angels" speech, Bruno and Sam have this exchange afterwards:
BRUNO When did you write that last part?
SAM In the car.
BRUNO Freak.
In both instances, Bruno shows real admiration for Bartlet and Sam.
There's also his courtship of Margaret, including the necklace he gifted her, with her correct name on it, which further shows his humanity.
Like I said, he's just a complex character that added necessary layers to both Bartlet's re-election campaign and Vinnick's campaign, who could be both funny and thought-provoking. Silver did a great job with him, may he R.I.P.
3. NSA Dr. Nancy McNally, portrayed by Anna Deveare Smith // 20 Episodes, Seasons 2-7
So, here we reach the highest-ranking female character on this list, and I think she's deserving. I think it is important to see women, and particularly minority women, in roles like this.
National Security Advisor is a big-time job with big-time responsibility, and time and again you see Nancy in a room with the president, the chief of staff, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and many other important people, and never is she the slightest bit intimidated, and never once is she treated with anything other than utmost respect from her peers. She is also an authority figure to those below her, and even Bartlet's staff treats her accordingly. I have to imagine it matters for younger African-American women to see roles like this.
Nancy is present in many of the show's most intense storylines, from the assassination attempt to Zoey's kidnapping and more, and she always appears in total command. Even in some smaller storylines, she projects authority - for example, in Someone's Going To Emergency, Someone's Going To Jail, the scene with her and Sam in the Situation Room, where she has to show him that that woman's grandfather was a spy. She's in complete control in that scene, and it's great to watch.
She's not just toughness and authority though, she can also let her hair down and show her emotions when appropriate. A classic example is the scene with her, Leo, and Fitz where she's just venting to them, saying she's had it, and let's attack, etc, and she calls Fitz "Admiral Sissymary". It just shows her frustrated and having to let it out.
Another example is her leading a round of applause for Bartlet the first time they're in the situation room after he announces his MS and his intention to run again.
She's just a terrific character, a three-dimensional person. Much credit to Anna Deveare Smith, a fantastic actress(and playwright) who was perfectly cast.
You have to think one of the reasons Kate Harper was an unpopular character was because Nancy all but disappeared after Kate was introduced, appearing in only four episodes after. So much screen time that should've, and would've been Nancy's, but was instead replaced by someone who wasn't half the character Nancy was.
2. Admiral Percy "Fitz" Fitzwallace, Chairman Of The Joint Chiefs Of Staff, portrayed by John Amos // 22 Episodes, Seasons 1, 3, 4, 5
John Amos was such an incredible presence on screen, any scene he was in, he pretty much owned(and that's saying something, as he shared much of his screen time with Martin Sheen). Between his physical size, commanding voice, and charismatic nature, you couldn't not pay attention to him. This is echoed in the way other characters respond to him. Bartlet's staff show him a level of respect and deference that they usually only reserve for Bartlet himself and Leo. That says it all.
Fitz was more or less based on Colin Powell, and the character did him proud. On television, fictitious generals and admirals in a political context are often depicted as conservative caricatures, just wanting to bomb everything in site, and Fitz was a much deeper character than that.
Take the scene where he walks in on the debate about gays serving in the military, and more or less rips all the conservatives in the room a new one, ending with "put that in your pipe and smoke it".
Doesn't mean he's a liberal - it's pointed out when he's briefly considered as a VP candidate that no one even knows if he's a Democrat or Republican - but it does mean he's not exactly an ideologue, and that being both a military man and a man of color makes him see the world in a certain way.
There are so many classic Fitz scenes to look at.
His super-intense conversation with Leo, just the two of them, in the Situation Room, where he talks Leo into taking out Shareef. The way he starts by trying to break the ice with talk about shampoo, and then subtlely shifts the conversation to what he really wants to talk about...
Fitz: "Can you tell when it's peacetime and wartime anymore?"
Leo: "No."
Fitz: "I don't know who the world's leading expert on warfare is but any list of the top has got to include me and I can't tell when it's peacetime and wartime anymore."
Leo: "Look, international law has always recognized certain protected persons who you couldn't attack. It's been this way since the Romans."
Fitz: "In peacetime. . . ."
Leo: ". . . I don't like where this conversation's going. . . ."
Fitz: "We killed Yamamoto. We shot down his plane."
Leo: "We declared war. . . . I'm going to get back to the office."
Fitz: "We measure the success of a mission by two things: was it successful and how few civilians did we hurt. They measure success by how many. . . . You're talking to me about international laws. The laws of nature don't even apply here! I've been a soldier for 38 years and I've found an enemy I can kill. He can't cancel Shareef's trip, Leo. You've got to tell him, he can't cancel it."
Amos nails it here, the urgency and conviction seem SO genuine. The scene stays seared in your mind.
Another classic is the scene I mentioned while talking about Nancy, when it's her, Leo, and Fitz in the Situation Room. After she gets through venting, this happens:
NANCY Just fly in at night, and while you're at it, could you order the USS Louisians to fire off a D-5 Trident just to see if it works? What's the worst that could happen?
FITZWALLACE [bewildered, to Leo] Is she talking to me?
NANCY Yes!
FITZWALLACE Well, 98% of all living organisms within a seven mile radius would die instantly in a torrent of fire.
Amos's delivery here is so perfect and so deadpan, it just cracks me up every time.
I mean I could go on and on, but I guess I'll finish by talking about his death.
I'm not sure why they decided to kill Fitz off in the Gaza attack, and I know it's not a popular decision for a lot of people, but I'll say this: You know a character was great when his death really makes you feel something, and in that moment when Leo tells Bartlet that Fitz was among the fatalities, you feel that. You feel it. And Bartlet goes to visit Fitz's widow(even though they changed her name), you feel that too. It makes an impact.
You don't get that impact if you're not a great, great character.
At this point, there's one character left, but I'm about to hit the 40000 character limit, so I'm going to have to that last character in a reply...
submitted by namkcuR to thewestwing [link] [comments]


2018.03.22 15:50 govna3000 Insomniacs Anonymous (TV Pilot)-DarkComedy-(29pgs)

Please keep in mind before you read that this is an EXTREMELY ROUGH draft so don't expect Aaron Sorkin professionalism here. More than anything I want to make sure this idea doesn't suck lol. Thanks in advance!
Insomniacs Anonymous explores the lives of the sleep deprived in a darkly comic, cynical and refreshing way. These people are thoroughly miserable but constantly entertaining.
A dark comedy about Bruce Park- a divorced, penniless, out of work former car salesman that loses everything and is forced to move back home with his cantankerous mother. As a side effect of medication from his depression he develops insomnia. One night on an online "Insomniacs" dating site he meets Nadia. Bruce finds out not only is Nadia an EMT that works the graveyard shift, but a cocaine addict. When Nadia accidentally kills her partner in an overdose she takes Bruce along and convinces him to assume the dead partners identity. With seemingly nothing else to lose he agrees and they travel around the city embarking on adventures and evading trouble (mostly caused by themselves). They also join a local support group for insomniacs and its interesting assortment of characters.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1evZM4LSMnR5xTMrPzJFbsrB-9gT5HMcm/view?usp=sharing
submitted by govna3000 to ReadMyScript [link] [comments]


2017.08.20 05:40 autotldr Stuart J. Thompson, Award-Winning Broadway Producer, Dies at 62

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 49%. (I'm a bot)
Among the winners were his stagings of Yasmina Reza's "God of Carnage," named best play in 2009, and of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, named best revival of a play in 2012.Mr. Thompson produced the three longest-running plays on Broadway of the last 25 years: Charles Busch's "The Tale of the Allergist's Wife," David Auburn's "Proof" and Simon Stephens' "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.".
He was also a producer of the repertory productions of "Waiting for Godot" and "No Man's Land" at the Cort Theater in New York.In 2010, the Commercial Theater Institute honored him with its annual award for outstanding achievement in commercial theater producing.
Mr. Thompson's first Broadway assignment was as general manager of Aaron Sorkin's "A Few Good Men" at the Music Box Theater in 1989.
Mr. Thompson was more recently executive producer for the American companies of "The Book of Mormon" and as a producer of the West End and Australian productions.
He also served on the board of the Broadway League and Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS.Lorne Michaels, a producing partner with Stuart Thompson Productions of the forthcoming musical "Mean Girls," said in a statement that Mr. Thompson had helped lead him and the actress and writer Tina Fey through the development of the show.
The marquees of Broadway theaters will be dimmed in his memory for one minute at 6:45 p.m. on Tuesday, the Broadway League said.
Summary Source FAQ Feedback Top keywords: produced#1 Thompson#2 Theater#3 Broadway#4 productions#5
Post found in /entertainment.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]


2017.05.03 19:30 WryRigmarole 30 [M4F] Baltimore/DC - Despise dating...looking for the Leia to my Han, Zoe to my Wash, Hermione to my Ron, the Arwen to my Aragorn

Strap in, this is going to be long. I'm well known for my rambling dissertations. And this will prove a fantastic example of my Sorkin-style internal monologue put to paper (so to speak).
I'm back. Posting once again after making a few meaningful connections that result in ghosting. A side-effect of the internet age I suppose. But I remain resolute! If not slightly disillusioned...
I've been thinking a lot about what to post here, how does one convey oneself? How do I attract the attention of the type of person I'm looking for? Is it by listing a series of qualities as if I am going grocery shopping? Is it by providing my own traits and seeing who responds? I think this time I'll try something a bit different; I will attempt to convey the images, the flashes, the distant dreams of the yet-to-be discovered companion and confidant. And maybe, just maybe, someone else is out there who is having similar fantasies.
First and foremost I want someone who wants to be a part of my family, which at the moment is comprised of myself, and my two Saint Bernard senior citizens. Nothing in the world is more important to me than my pups (pictures attached: http://imgur.com/a/cj8fg LOOK AT THOSE FACES!!!). Dog parks and road trips, vet visits and slobber. I'm not looking for someone that just accepts my dogs, but rather someone that loves them. People sometimes say, “you'll win me over when my dogs love you more than me”, but I beg to differ. You will win me over when you love my dogs more than me. When I am concerned that you are blowing me off to cuddle with my furry love-bugs. When you smile at their big faces waking us up in the middle of the night for some 3am pets.
I'm looking for someone that can't help but smile as I sing loudly (and perhaps poorly?) to every 90s alternative song that comes on the radio, regardless of how many people are nearby. A quiet and romantic moment laying down and Gin Blossoms comes on Pandora? Immediate exuberant singing to an audience of one, as you laugh and smile (and perhaps just a little bit of judgment).
I'm looking for someone that wants to cuddle together while we play a video game, deciding what to make the character look like, and what decisions to enact. Your arms and legs wrapped around me while Earth is attacked by the Reapers, or New York City requires saving from a deadly virus!
Cute date-nights, walking the inner harbor, hand-in-hand. Midnight releases of the latest Sci-Fi or Fantasy movie. A new wine bar, escape room, laser tag, board game night – all with our friends. Medieval Times while we loudly cheer for our knight (I don't care if it's scripted, dammit!). Constant public-displays-of-affection throughout all of the above.
I want someone that looks forward to the supposed-monotony of many evenings of cuddles, homemade dinners, and binge-watching Netflix and Twitch, the puppies doubling as pillows.
I want someone to bug me daily until I finally relent, smile, and plan a trip to Harry Potter world, or Blizzcon, or an Italian beach (I've been to Harry Potter world, it was amazing).
I'm looking for my partner-in-crime, my frisky companion and fellow nerd, to help me conquer the world.
If you stalk my post history, you'll see that a few months ago my former other-half left me after almost 9 years; one morning while I was asleep, taking one of our dogs, my truck, and leaving me with an e-mail, and very little of my self-confidence. I need someone compassionate that understands this, and is willing to be supportive as I continue to heal, and we create new memories together.
I don't mind distance. But as the above imagery likely makes clear, I'm looking for something that requires physical proximity. If you're remote, I'd likely prefer someone who sees a future where you are local to the DC/Baltimore area.
I suppose I should touch on some of the more superficial. I'm 6'2, 190, white (Italian-Irish), brown haiblue eyes, trimmed beard and glasses, and I'm relatively athletic. I'd likely be looking for someone that likes to stay similarly fit/healthy. I'm an aerospace engineer, and very accomplished in my field – my background being in Applied Mathematics and Statistics. I own my own home, which I share with my pups, and I like to volunteer with some local animal rescues when time allows. Earlier in life, I was a math teacher, I enjoyed it very much, and I still occasionally volunteer with some local schools that are lacking in talented mathematics instructors for their AP classes. I'm also trying to get back into music, just recently got my sax repaired!
I've put way more time into my OKC profile than I am willing to admit, so I'll copy some of the contents here.
“My self-summary:
OkCupid tells me to respond to this by answering, "how would your best friends describe you?" So I asked two of them:
"King of the Nerds"
"Genuine"
"Aggressively sarcastic"
"Empathetic"
"S-M-R-T...I mean S-M-A-R-T"
"Brutally honest"
"Two-Time Winner of the Cleanliest Office Award"
For what it is worth (very little), my "personality type" is ENTJ. I have a couple tattoos if that's something that's a deal breaker for you, and I do plan on getting a few more - the symbols for the names of my dogs, and my dogs that have passed away.
I'm opinionated; I enjoy discussing and debating anything from politics to physics to moral rhetoricals (my most recent topic of interest is the moral implications of autonomous vehicles and the decision making process during accidents). I also don't really keep my opinions to myself.
I don't shy away from confrontation - you pay now or you pay more later, I'd rather address a problem right here and now, as opposed to letting it sit and fester.
Most people that know me would claim I am one of the most rational individuals they've ever met, and that's likely true. But for anyone that really knows me, they know I'm actually a hopeless romantic. With emphasis on "hopeless".
Favorite books, movies, shows, music, and food:
Books: Forgotten Realms, Dragonlance, Tolkein, R.A. Salvatore, Ready Player One
Movies: Lord of the Rings, Dr. Horrible's Sing-A-Long Blog, Burn After Reading, The Usual Suspects, Blade Runner, Dogma, Donnie Darko, Cloud Atlas, Office Space, Memento, Pitch Perfect. (I can sing just about every song from Dr. Horrible and Pitch Perfect.)
Shows: The West Wing, The Newsroom, Black Mirror, Westworld, The Man in the High Castle, Band of Brothers, Game of Thrones, Stranger Things, 30 Rock, The Americans, 24, Firefly, Scrubs, Law & Order (the original), Star Trek (all of them, but especially TNG and DS9). Anything written by Aaron Sorkin or Joss Whedon.
Music: My 90s Alternative Pandora station is like a child - I raised it and watched it grow into something I'm proud of. Lots of other stuff as well, I listen to just about everything (except perhaps country), I also enjoy acoustic covers. Additionally, I love singing any song I know the words to (and some that I don't).
Food: Pasta, Cheese, any combination of the above, Vodka Sauce. Seafood.
Games: Blizzard Games (Heroes of the Storm, Hearthstone, etc.), Mass Effect (Andromeda is coming out soon and I'm really excited!), Deus Ex, and a massive steam library (that I am both proud and ashamed of). I also love RPGs, like D&D or Shadowrun; I once played in a Shadowrun campaign that lasted 10 years and ended friendships (kidding).
I spend a lot of time thinking about:
Virtual Reality: I love VR - people don't understand how VAR is about to change our world. I have an HTC Vive and a whole room dedicated to it. I call it “the Holodeck”.
Politics: It is the responsibility of those that know better, to do better. To speak up and try to make a difference.
Climate Change: Probably the scariest topic of the current political climate. This is something that will have a lasting impact on our world. Probably very few things as important as this.
The Future: This sort of relates to VR. I enjoy discussing - and when possible, taking part in - the types of things that will shape the future.
Video/Board/RPG Games: I'm a gaming enthusiast. I enjoy seeing technology change over time, and how it allows us to become more and more immersed into another reality. I also enjoy games made out of nothing but paper and pencil, and how our creativity can create whole universes.
You should message me if:
You are torn between wanting to cuddle with me versus my dogs, you understand "nerd" to be a compliment, and you enjoy the debate as much as the resolution.
Also (and perhaps this is one of those things I shouldn't say, but this gets back to my brutal honesty thing), I am not a fan of the initial courting phase of meeting someone new; when people put up a good front, or pretend to be something else. I like to lay it all out (8 hour Q&A on day 1). Tell me about your oddities and eccentricities. I'm weird, I'm a nut, we all are to some degree or another (perhaps myself more than most). And that's a good thing - that's what makes us interesting and unique.
I'm looking for something real. Someone who wants to enjoy experiences together, and wants to enjoy time with myself and my dogs. Someone who will never lie to me. Who can be entrusted with my secrets and vulnerabilities, and will entrust me with theirs. Someone who will never...ever break my trust.
I'm looking for my cute, unique, cuddling, dog-loving, movie-watching, breakfast-in-bed-on-the-weekends, geeky, try-anything-once, compassionate, supportive, open-minded, opinionated, ravishing, loyal, honest, game-loving, nerd. Is that really so much to ask? insert wry smile here
Phew. Okay, there we have it. If you're still reading, color me impressed. I think we lost the rest of the lot back around mile-marker 88.
Let's exchange pictures, stories, support. I'm an open-book, ask anything you'd like. I'm happy to provide pictures, and I'd appreciate if you did as well. Tell me what, if anything, resonated with you in my above overly-verbose auto-biography. Or maybe you hated it all, and just want to let me know I have a typo on line 327 (I actually would welcome the correction).
Mighty internet, I lay down before you! Go henceforth, and find me my Princess!
Send me a message, prove my pessimism wrong.
submitted by WryRigmarole to R4R30Plus [link] [comments]


2017.03.28 14:28 xaviertobin This year is shaping up to be a huge one for film. Here's a list of 45+ promising movies to watch out for this year, including basic descriptions, early reviews and trailers. Organised between original and franchise films.

Every year I feel like I miss a heap of movies that I know exist or have been recommended that fly under my radar when they’re in cinemas. This year I starting making a list in Google Keep to keep track of films to watch, and it started getting so big that I figured it’d be worth sharing. There are definitely some really promising sequels and franchise movies coming out this year, but I’ve gone into more detail for the original films given that they don’t tend to have the same marketing presence, and because so many look like they’ll be excellent. Let me know if there’s anything promising that I’ve missed, I’ll come back and keep this last updated so you can refer to it in the future!

First, 28 non-sequel, non-reboot, non-remake films to watch out for (will be updated with 10 more suggestions from the comments):

There’s a huge number of promising original movies here. There’s not a single one here that looks bad on paper (IMO), whether it be because of the director, cast or because of a unique plot.

Battle of the Sexes

A sports drama-comedy starring Emma Stone and Steve Carrell. Directed by the directors of Little Miss Sunshine, written by the writers of Slumdog Millionaire, cinematographer of La La Land and the composer of Moonlight. Plot loosely based on the 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs.

The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara

An upcoming historical period drama film starring Mark Rylance as Pope Pius IX, Oscar Isaac and Isaac Eshete. Directed by Steven Spielberg and composed by John Williams.

A Ghost Story

“A ghost (Casey Affleck) silently observes his grieving widow (Rooney Mara) in his beloved home.“ Really solid reviews so far, and a great cast. Definitely one to look forward to.

Baby Driver

“Talented getaway driver Baby (Ansel Elgort) relies on the beat of his personal soundtrack to be the best in the game. After meeting the woman (Lily James) of his dreams, he sees a chance to ditch his shady lifestyle and make a clean break.” A new Edgar Wright original. If that isn't enough to sell you, the movie is so far on 100% with an average rating of 8.5/10 on Rotten Tomatoes. Trailer here.

Gemini

“A heinous crime tests the complex relationship between a tenacious personal assistant and her Hollywood starlet boss.” Directed by Aaron Kratz, extremely positive reviews from critics out of SXSW. Looks like a great mystery-thriller.

Molly’s Game

“The true story of Molly Bloom, a young skier and former Olympic hopeful becomes a successful entrepreneur (and a target of an FBI investigation) when she establishes a high-stakes, international poker game.” Screenplay adapted by Aaron Sorkin and directed by him in his directorial debut. Starring Jessica Chastain, Idris Elba, Kevin Costner, Brian d'Arcy James and Chris O'Dowd. Can’t wait for this one, amazing writer, great cast, and a possibly great director (hopefully a bit of David Fincher has rubbed onto Sorkin).

The Death of Stalin

A political satire chronicling the events that transpired after the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953. Directed and written by the creator of Veep and The Thick of It, Armando Iannucci.

Dunkirk

“Follows the true story of the Dunkirk evacuation in WW2.” The next film by Christopher Nolan, starring Tom Hardy, Cillian Murphy, Mark Rylance and others. Can’t wait for this one, obviously. Trailer here.

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

“After months have passed without a culprit in her daughter’s murder case, Mildred Hayes (Frances McDormand) makes a bold move, painting three signs leading into her town with a controversial message directed at William Willoughby (Woody Harrelson), the town’s revered chief of police.” This one looks great. Written and directed by Martin McDonagh, the creator of In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths. This guy doesn’t make movies often, but when he does they don’t disappoint. Trailer here.

The Snowman

“Detective Harry Hole (Michael Fassbender) investigates the disappearance of a woman whose pink scarf is found wrapped around an ominous-looking snowman." Directed by Tomas Alfredson (Let The Right One In, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) and starring Michael Fassbender, this is looking to be a pretty great British crime drama. Based on the novel of the same name.

Coco

“Coco follows a 12-year-old boy named Miguel who sets off a chain of events relating to a century-old mystery, leading to an extraordinary family reunion.” An original Pixar film! I’m keen, especially after Inside Out. Trailer here.

Colossal

“A bizarre sci-fi comedy starring Anne Hathaway who discovers that she is strangely connected to a monster attacking Seoul, South Korea. When she moves, the monster moves.” Looks bizarre and creative, with positive (but also divisive) reviews. Seems like the kind of movie that could become a quiet cult classic. Trailer here.

Wind River

“An FBI agent teams up with a veteran game tracker to investigate a murder that occurred on a Native American reservation.” Written and directed by Taylor Sheridan, the writer of Hell or High Water. Starring Elizabeth Olsen and Jeremy Renner. Really solid reviews so far.

The Disaster Artist

Based on the book of the same name, “The Disaster Artist is a 2017 American biographical comedy film directed, produced by, and starring James Franco. Based on Greg Sestero's non-fiction book of the same name, the film chronicles the making of the 2003 cult film The Room.” Early reviews are fantastic, supposedly Franco’s best work. I’m so excited for this.

Mother

"Centers on a couple whose relationship is tested when uninvited guests arrive at their home, disrupting their tranquil existence." Written and directed by Darren Aronofsky, starring Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem and Domnhall Gleeson. What an amazing team, another one I'm very keen for.

The Book of Henry

“When a boy who is being raised by his single mother develops feelings for the girl next door, he plots a murder to protect the girl from the ongoing harm of her father. “ A Colin Treverrow (Jurassic World, Safety not Guaranteed) film starring Naomi Watts, Maddie Ziegler and Jacob Tremblay.

The Big Sick

“The Big Sick is based on the real courtship of Kumail Nanjiani and his now-wife, Emily Gordon. Kumail's traditional Muslim family are unhappy with his relationship with Emily, an American. When Emily is waylaid by a mysterious illness, Kumail must take charge of the crisis with her parents, Beth and Terry“. Written by and starring Kumail Nanjiani. If the extremely positive reviews from SXSW are anything to go by, this is worth a watch.

Free Fire

“Set in Boston in 1978, a meeting in a deserted warehouse between two gangs turns into a shootout and a game of survival.” A fun, intense, “bottle-episode” kind of movie starring Brie Larson, Armie Hammer, Sharlto Copley and Cillian Murphy. Coming in April, and early reviews are very solid. Unlikely to be a game-changer, but apparently a really enjoyable watch. Trailer here.

Lucky

“Lucky follows the spiritual journey of a 90-year-old atheist — played by Harry Dean Stanton — and the quirky characters that inhabit his off-the-map desert town. He finds himself at the precipice of life, thrust into a journey of self-exploration.” Directed by John Carroll Lynch and starring Harry Dean Stanton. Another film with great reviews out of SXSW.

Raw

“Stringent vegetarian Justine (Garance Marillier) encounters a decadent, merciless and dangerously seductive world during her first week at veterinary school.” A directorial debut from Julia Ducournau, Raw is apparently hard to watch, but also hard to look away from. Trailer here (NSFW).

Small Town Crime

“An alcoholic ex-cop finds the body of a young woman and, through an act of self-redemption, becomes hell-bent on finding the killer.” Directed by Eshom and Ian Nelms, starring John Hawkes and Octavia Spencer. Early reviews and first thoughts are quite promising.

Wonder

“Auggie Pullman (Jacob Tremblay) is a young boy born with a facial deformity who moves into a new school and tries to fit in.“ Directed by Stephen Chbosky (writer and director of Perks of Being a Wallflower), also starring Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson.

American Made

“American Made tells the story of Barry Seal (Tom Cruise), a pilot who is recruited by the CIA to help counter the emerging communist threat in Central America. Seal's role in this major CIA covert operation led in turn to his involvement with the Medellin carte”. A biographical drama crime-thriller, directed by Doug Liman (The Bourne Identity, Edge of Tomorrow).

Personal Shopper

“A young American in Paris works as a personal shopper for a celebrity. She seems to have the ability to communicate with spirits, like her recently deceased twin brother. Soon, she starts to receive ambiguous messages from an unknown source.” Directed by Olivier Assayas and featuring an apparently excellent performance by Kristen Stewart. Good to great reviews so far.

Logan Lucky

“Trying to reverse a family curse, brothers Jimmy (Channing Tatum) and Clyde Logan (Adam Driver) set out to execute an elaborate robbery during the legendary Coca-Cola 600 race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina during Memorial Day weekend.” Directed by Steven Soderbergh (Ocean’s 11, Out of Sight, Contagion), starring Channing Tatum, Daniel Craig, Adam Driver, Hilary Swank and more. Absolutely stacked cast, and a great director. Can’t wait for this.

The Dark Tower

Based on the book series by Stephen King, I expect the IMDB plot will not do the story justice: “The Gunslinger, Roland Deschain, roams an Old West-like landscape where "the world has moved on" in pursuit of the man in black. Also searching for the fabled Dark Tower, in the hopes that reaching it will preserve his dying world.”. Directed by Nikolaj Arcel and starring Idris Elba, Kathryn Winnick and Matthew McConaughey.

The Circle

“A young tech worker takes a job at a powerful Internet corporation, quickly rises up the company's ranks, and soon finds herself in a perilous situation concerning privacy, surveillance and freedom.” Directed by James Ponsoldt (The Spectacular Now, End of the Tour), and starring Emma Watson and Tom Hanks. Trailer here.

Get Out

“A young African-American man visits his Caucasian girlfriend's mysterious family estate.” This has been out for a while in the US (unfortunately will have to wait til May in Australia!), but I’ve included it just in case. Sitting at 99% on Rotten Tomatoes with only a single rotten review. Apparently excellent.

Additions from comments:

[Wonder Wheel]

"Plot unknown. Described as a period drama set in New York in the 1950s." Written and Directed by Woody Allen, starring Kate Winslet, Juno Temple and Justin Timberlake.

[Annihilation]

"A biologist signs up for a dangerous, secret expedition where the laws of nature don't apply." Based on the book of the same name.** Directed and adapted by Alex Garland, the writer of Ex Machina. Starring Natalie Portman, Oscar Isaac and Jennifer Jason Leigh.**

[Mute]

"A mute bartender goes up against his city's gangsters in an effort to find out what happened to his missing partner." Directed by Duncan Jones, written by Michael Robert Johnson and Duncan Jones. Starring Alexander Skarsgård, Justin Theroux and Sam Rockwell.

[Submergence]

I feel like the IMDB description of this gives a bit too much away, so I've found a more generic description: "An upcoming American-French-Spanish romantic thriller film, based on the novel of same name." Directed by Wim Wenders, starring Alicia Vikander, James McAvoy and Charlotte Rampling.

[Suburbicon]

There aren't many plot details for this, but it's been in the making for decades. Apparently the Coen brothers wrote the script in 1986. Directed by George Clooney, starring Matt Damon, Julianne Moore, Josh Brolin and Oscar Isaac. Definitely promising on paper.

[Hostiles]

[Wonderstruck]

[Darkest Hour]

[The Current War]

[Downsizing]

[The Shape of Water]

[The Beguiled]

[The Killing of a Sacred Deer]

[It Comes at Night]

[Under the Silver Lake]

[Okja]

[Call Me by Your Name]

[You Were Never Really Here]

[Last Flag Flying]

[Stronger]

And the sequels, reboots and big franchises:

I’m excited for a ton of these movies (kind of in order actually!). Here’s hoping they all turn out to be as good as I thought Logan was.
All together that comes to 50 movies, about 30 of which I wanna see in cinemas. I'm going to go broke, yay.
Hope you found a few you hadn't heard of and are interested in, and let me know if I've missed anything!
submitted by xaviertobin to movies [link] [comments]


The Newsroom Season 1, episode 4, last 5 minutes If Aaron Sorkin Had Written The Matrix 'A Few Good Men' - The Good Aaron Sorkin Helps One Of His Student Propose To Girlfriend During Webinar Class Two Jews On Steve Jobs Aaron Sorkin CAMEO in The West Wing

Why Kristin Davis Never Married Heavy.com

  1. The Newsroom Season 1, episode 4, last 5 minutes
  2. If Aaron Sorkin Had Written The Matrix
  3. 'A Few Good Men' - The Good
  4. Aaron Sorkin Helps One Of His Student Propose To Girlfriend During Webinar Class
  5. Two Jews On Steve Jobs
  6. Aaron Sorkin CAMEO in The West Wing

Aaron Sorkin helps make surprise proposal happen over Zoom during AFI seminar - Duration: 2:41. American Film Institute 1,366 views. 2:41. A Look Back With Aaron Sorkin - West Wing Then and Now - Duration: 6:35. The Paley Center for Media 4,964 views Aaron Sorkin, creator of The West Wing, bidding farewell to his masterpiece in the very last episode. ... Stephen Colbert tells the story of when he knew his wife Evie was the one + Evie's cameo ... By Joan Alperin-Schwartz 'Steve Jobs' directed by Danny Boyle and written by the uber talented Aaron Sorkin, is a journey into the mind of a visionary who changed our world. The man, Steve Jobs ... Young Aaron Sorkin interview on 'A Few Good Men' (1993) - Duration: ... Margin Call 4 - Senior Partners Emergency Meeting - Duration: 9:49. Olivier BOSSARD Recommended for you. Why Aaron Sorkin belongs on cable TV. The most raw, real emotion Between colleagues with complex and passionate relationships - sorry for the bad TV video!